CAMPUSPEAK http://www.campuspeak.com Thu, 23 Mar 2017 12:34:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.4 99955535 Spring Fever http://www.campuspeak.com/springfever/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 12:21:46 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24241 Spring is officially here, spring break has likely come and gone, and the rapid pace of the end of the semester is about to begin. While this is often filled with exciting events, it can also be a time with numerous deadlines and long to-do lists. The stress of getting it all done may lead […]

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Lorin Phillips

Spring is officially here, spring break has likely come and gone, and the rapid pace of the end of the semester is about to begin. While this is often filled with exciting events, it can also be a time with numerous deadlines and long to-do lists. The stress of getting it all done may lead to us being less understanding of your roommate’s annoying habits, team member’s lack of follow-through, or people emailing you questions about things you just announced the night before. The end of the semester combined with a sense of responsibility leaves many leaders frustrated, confused, and over it. You have a choice – ignore it all and get through the semester or step up and address it. Susan Scott said it best in her book Fierce Conversations, “You get what you tolerate.”

What are you tolerating? What needs to be discussed to help your organization focus more on collaboration instead of trying to resolve small personal issues? What decisions do you need to make to get results instead of just participating in every activity or event that comes across the calendar? Are those events even things your members enjoy and align with your values? What do you need to tackle today in order to have a clear list of priorities so you can stop feeling overwhelmed? What are those things that keep you up at night? Do you have that list? If you don’t, take a second and write it down.

So what is stopping you from having that conversation? Do you find yourself saying things like:

  • What do I know? I don’t want to be disrespectful of an officer/senior/advisor.
  • No use saying anything. ___________ doesn’t care what I think.
  • I have no idea what is happening here…it is best to be quiet and look to my officer board to fix this.
  • Nothing I say will make a difference. Why bother?
  • ________ is just going through a hard time and just needs to talk.
  • I’m impatient with this person and just need the summer break to get here. It’ll be better after the summer.

If so, you’re letting your fears and excuses stand square in the way of resolving all of those things that are keeping you up at night. Fears are natural. So is stress and the toll conflict takes on our well-being. My guess is that avoiding the conversation isn’t helping you, them, and your organization. What might happen if nothing changes? I really want you to reflect on that for a moment. What are the potential impacts and outcomes if nothing changes? If those aren’t things you want to see happen, then it is time to do a little adulting and tackle the tough stuff. Not the easy small stuff. We’re all guilty at some point of checking the small things off of our to-do list meanwhile leaving that 30-page paper for later. Tackle that 30-page now.

Where do you begin?

  1. Decide to have the conversation. This isn’t a chapter meeting speech, novel of an email or social media post. This is a face to face, in-person conversation.
  2. Determine who you need to talk with first and invite them to talk. The keyword is “invite” them. Be sure they know this is a problem-solving conversation, not an accountability conversation.
  3. When you invite them to the conversation, be clear on what you want to discuss and what is at stake. For example: I’d like to about the senior bar crawl. I know it is a tradition and it got out of control last year. I’m nervous about someone getting hurt or getting in trouble. I’d like to think about a new tradition that upholds our policies and ensures the safety of our members. I’d love your help to brainstorm some ideas and possible solutions.
  4. Describe the ideal. If you were to take some steps toward “better,” what would that look like? You don’t have to have all of the answers for how to get there, but be able to articulate and outcome. What does it look like if the issue is resolved?
  5. Make a list of questions to ask, not statements to make. The simple act of asking more questions about things you are curious about learning versus statements and being genuinely interested in their viewpoint will change your tone, open up the dialog, and create an environment for collaborative problem-solving.
  6. If you are having the conversation for the right reasons, no matter the outcome it was the right conversation. Be confident in yourself, be confident in your purpose.

 

“Our work, our relationships, and our lives succeed or fail one conversation at a time.
While no single conversation is guaranteed to transform a company, a relationship, or a life, any single conversation can.”

― Susan ScottFierce Conversations: Achieving Success at Work and in Life One Conversation at a Time

 

To learn more about Lorin and her confrontation keynote and chapter check-in program, visit campuspeak.com/phillips

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Do you even care? http://www.campuspeak.com/doyoucare/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 11:55:39 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24233 Over the past handful of months, social media has looked like thousands of people all trying to have a “conversation” with their own megaphone.  Most of it was an unproductive hot mess. I would be fascinated to see data about if Facebook posts actually changed people’s minds, or if it just caused us to fall […]

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James Robilotta

Over the past handful of months, social media has looked like thousands of people all trying to have a “conversation” with their own megaphone.  Most of it was an unproductive hot mess. I would be fascinated to see data about if Facebook posts actually changed people’s minds, or if it just caused us to fall deeper into our own worlds, causing deeper rifts between political colors, genders, races, religions, and socio-economic classes

No matter what, what has not been happening enough is listening to each other. Politics and religion bring out the worst in us. Compassion, patience, and having an open mind all often get thrown out the window.  We are so set in our ways that we no longer regard others’ opinions and stories. If we are ever going to progress, this has to change.

We have all been taught at some time or another what active listening is. For those who need a refresher, active listening means:

  • Maintain good eye contact
  • Square your shoulders to face the other person
  • Nod your head at various points
  • Then paraphrase what the other person said before asserting your own thoughts or asking another question.

Those all sound great, and sure, they could work.  But I would like to offer an alternative:

Care.

Just care, friends. When you care about someone you naturally lean in, maintain good eye contact, ask better questions, etc. It is possible for you to fake active listening, believe me I have done it. But it is not possible to fake caring. When someone tries to fake caring it is so blatantly obvious. It’s time to start having better conversations. It’s time to start caring.

People tell me they hate small talk because it’s inauthentic and surface.  The main way we shift from small talk into meaningful dialogue is by choosing to care. When humans choose to care about someone else they slow down. Caring people are question-askers, rather than explainers and advice-givers. They practice patience AND empathy.

I am not sure when it became cool not to care, but if you don’t care about anything, then what will you ever be proud of? It’s time to change the way we interact with each other. Start with your next conversation.  Catch yourself if your brain wanders and then reinvest, lean in, share something about yourself, ask a deeper question, reflect about their answer. The election and its wake have not taught me that we are not listening to each other, it just reinforced that unfortunate reality. Let us be better humans.  Let us care.

To learn more about James Robilotta visit http://www.campuspeak.com/robilotta.

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How does one find their life’s passion? By serving others. http://www.campuspeak.com/life-passion/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 11:34:02 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24218 Nowadays we are asked to volunteer for many different things – from serving at food banks, to walk-a-thons, to participating in breast cancer awareness events. All of which are important. But while volunteering, we often act mechanically without a thought – except to just to get it over with. To volunteer is to give of […]

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Andrea Mosby

Nowadays we are asked to volunteer for many different things – from serving at food banks, to walk-a-thons, to participating in breast cancer awareness events. All of which are important. But while volunteering, we often act mechanically without a thought – except to just to get it over with.

To volunteer is to give of one’s self and to truly find out who you are and what you are made of.

There are many advantages to volunteering, but I’d like to highlight three that I believe are the difference in finding one’s passion and determining one’s destination for life.

Before I began my professional speaking career, my younger sister approached me and asked if I’d speak at her school about the topic of teen pregnancy. She indicated that they were having a panel of speakers to talk about their experience. I immediately said, yes. And the experience was life changing. I discovered that I had the ability to tell stories that were very relatable and at times even funny, but, I could get a serious point across. After my initial presentation, I was rewarded with a request from teachers asking if I’d come back to speak to the students because of their positive response.

I found myself volunteering to go to the school once a month to speak with students. What I got out of the experience was well above what I believe my audience received from me. I realized I had the skill to speak. I also realized I had a story that needed to be shared, which brought value to others through my experiences and message.

The first level of volunteering is to say yes. So often we hesitate to say yes to an experience that will cause us to move out of our comfort zone, but yet moving out of our comfort zone is the key to finding your “zone.”

The second level of volunteering is willing to be vulnerable. Had you been at that presentation on teen pregnancy, you would have heard how nervous I sounded, how much I stuttered and stammered during the presentation, yet it seemed like the students were willing to allow me not to be perfect because the message was authentic. This brings me to the final level in finding one’s passion.

The third level is to be authentic. When my sister asked me to speak, it was because she witnessed the point in my life where I struggled, yet she also saw how I was living my life authentically. I wasn’t trying to be anything other than a great mom to my son. While she saw the challenges I faced every day; she believed that my story might help other teens to delay having a child at a young age. She believed I could help them to move past their current challenges and become successful in their lives.

So how does one find their passion? First say “yes,” secondly by being willing to be “vulnerable” and thirdly by being true to thine own “authentic self.”*

 

The rest will follow.

 

 

*To Thine Own Self Be True” is a quote from the play “Hamlet” Act 1, sc.iii by William Shakespeare.  The speaker is a father who is giving advice to his son before the son leaves home.  If the son remains true to who he is, he will never be false to any man.

 

To learn more about Andrea Mosby visit http://www.campuspeak.com/mosby

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5 Tips for a Safer Spring Break http://www.campuspeak.com/safespringbreak/ Mon, 20 Mar 2017 16:50:34 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24216 It’s that time of year when college students around the country travel to sunny beaches and other vacation spots to enjoy their spring break. Unfortunately, some leave behind the knowledge they’ve gained and disregard some of the safer behaviors they’ve learned regarding alcohol use. Here are a few tips for a safer spring break, to […]

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Bobby Gordon

It’s that time of year when college students around the country travel to sunny beaches and other vacation spots to enjoy their spring break. Unfortunately, some leave behind the knowledge they’ve gained and disregard some of the safer behaviors they’ve learned regarding alcohol use. Here are a few tips for a safer spring break, to help reduce risks and negative consequences associated with heavy drinking:

Spring break is a marathon, not a sprint:  Several days of heavy drinking, let alone one night, can be very taxing on the body in terms of the liver and other organs. This also can affect your immune system, and many students have tests or exams immediately upon their return from spring break.

Hydrate: Alcohol is a dehydration agent, meaning it take water out of your system. Consider limiting alcohol consumption while being out in the sun or on the beach all day, and consider alternating water for alcohol (drink-for-drink) throughout the week.

Know your surroundings: Become familiar with where you’re staying and the neighborhood. Make plans with friends to meet up at specific locations or times. Watch out for each other. Keep your phone with you at all times, and avoid looking like a tourist with your phone in hand while attempting to look at a map.  Stay in groups and avoid going off alone. Intoxicated spring breakers often make easy targets for theft and other crimes.

Predatory drugs still exist: Always watch your drink being poured by the bartender, and take your drink directly from the bartender. Carry your drink with your hand covering the open top of your drink, making it difficult or impossible for someone to drop something in your drink in a crowd. Never trust your friends to watch your drink, as they are likely intoxicated too and may not pay attention to your open drink on the table or bar for you.

Designate a driver: With so many online apps and taxis now readily available, there’s no need to risk a DUI while on spring break.

Keep these tips in mind and have a fun and safe spring break!

To learn more about Bobby Gordon and his alcohol and other drug abuse programs visit http://www.campuspeak.com/gordon.

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Monica McGee Appointed Chief Operating Officer of CAMPUSPEAK http://www.campuspeak.com/mcgee/ Wed, 08 Mar 2017 21:34:09 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24131 March 8, 2017, Orlando, FL – CAMPUSPEAK announced today the appointment of Monica McGee as its Chief Operating Officer, effective April 3, 2017. “I’ve known Monica for over a decade and couldn’t be more excited for her to join our staff team. She has always had a student-first approach to her work that I admire,” says […]

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March 8, 2017, Orlando, FL – CAMPUSPEAK announced today the appointment of Monica McGee as its Chief Operating Officer, effective April 3, 2017.

“I’ve known Monica for over a decade and couldn’t be more excited for her to join our staff team. She has always had a student-first approach to her work that I admire,” says David Stollman, President of CAMPUSPEAK. “That approach will translate into ensuring that we continue to focus on outstanding customer service.”

Monica McGee has been working in student affairs for over 15 years. Throughout her career, she has worked at both private and public institutions, including University of the Pacific, Marquette University, Carnegie Mellon University and Arizona State University.

McGee has a deep affinity for the interfraternal experience, having joined Gamma Phi Beta while attending the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. She chose to pursue a career in Higher Education, earning her master’s degree in Student Affairs in Higher Education from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Monica is a consummate student affairs professional and believes deeply in the engagement of students outside of the classroom. Before her role managing the operations of the Memorial Union at Arizona State, she was an award-winning fraternity and sorority life advisor. In 2011, Monica was recognized as the Campus Professional of the Year by Beta Theta Pi fraternity, and in 2012, Monica received the Outstanding Campus Professional Award by the Association of Fraternity Advisors and the Fraternity Insurance Purchasing Group.

Commenting on her appointment, McGee says, “From the time that I was in college, I have seen the positive impact that CAMPUSPEAK has had on college students’ lives. I am truly excited to join the CAMPUSPEAK family. I am humbled and honored that I will have the opportunity to work with such an incredibly, talented group of speakers, facilitators, and staff members.”

 

About CAMPUSPEAK

Since 1999, CAMPUSPEAK has provided transformative learning experiences through its keynote speakers, interactive workshops, consulting, online education, and custom programs. Partnering with campuses and higher education organizations across the country, CAMPUSPEAK offers programming to educate and inspire students for success in their college years and beyond. Learn more at campuspeak.com.

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3 reasons the girl who has been single forever will become the best girlfriend. http://www.campuspeak.com/girlfriend/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:44:34 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24114 Check out Shinjini Das’ latest article about how the single life can mean more meaningful relationships later. 3 Reasons the Girl Who has Been Single Forever Will Become the Best Girlfriend To learn more about Shinjini visit: campuspeak.com/das

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Shinjini Das

Check out Shinjini Das’ latest article about how the single life can mean more meaningful relationships later.

3 Reasons the Girl Who has Been Single Forever Will Become the Best Girlfriend

To learn more about Shinjini visit: campuspeak.com/das

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The need for conversations on masculinity. http://www.campuspeak.com/masculinity/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:23:42 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24107 For me, masculinity has always been an interesting concept. I grew up in a military family surrounded by what some might consider ideologies of “traditional” masculinity. My father was stoic and expected achievement. Our lives were heavily ordered, and he served as the primary breadwinner, while my mother was a source of emotional support and […]

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Tim Mousseau

For me, masculinity has always been an interesting concept. I grew up in a military family surrounded by what some might consider ideologies of “traditional” masculinity. My father was stoic and expected achievement. Our lives were heavily ordered, and he served as the primary breadwinner, while my mother was a source of emotional support and nurturing.

I did not live in a military school by any means, but there were set expectations for how I behaved in public, how I tended to my responsibilities and swift repercussions for mischief. Which was a problem because, boy oh boy, did I love engaging in mischief.

From breaking my bone to dismantling items to see their inner workings to drawing on items not meant to be colored, I broke the rules frequently, and I broke them well. Where, for other boys in my class, it was not uncommon to hear “oh, boys will be boys,” for me, this refrain did not come as much. For a long time, I wondered why but now I realize a little more. The reason I was never given leniency, is because of my actions, in a sense, were not inherently masculine. Creativity, the expression of visible emotion, challenging teachers, not about rules but about what we were learning. I broke the rules but in a different way than my peers.

Reflecting on this, I was always curious about why sometimes, my decisions stood out, why adults bothered me, why I stood out from my peers and why I received more pushback against my behaviors, especially the more artistic ones.

Growing up, I did not have the answers for this. As an adult, as much as I have worked in the arena of masculinity, supporting male survivors of sexual assault and seeking to understand how men can move the needle on this issue, I still don’t have all the answers.

For every statement I make, hundreds of others could challenge these sentiments. Whether data-driven, anecdotal, or cultural, there is no lack of resources on masculinity that skews one way or the other. I am not here to define for you what it means to be a man.

Because that is not my place.

One of the biggest things we see about masculinity is that it is often dictated by our cultures. The campus you call home, the organizations you are a part of, the geographic location of your campus, and even your original home. All of these features dictate how you define masculinity.

Your environment, both past, and present factor into how we view this topic. For example, in Denver, my current home, I am fairly in the norm with a beard, tattoos, a motorcycle, and other Denverite-based features. Now, put me in another place in our country, and my masculinity might come across as flamboyant or outright in opposition to your definition of this.

This is okay. Masculinity is a sliding scale where the values we place in this term, the way we define it, and what we consider to be masculine are constantly shifting. Sure, across the United States there are more traditional hallmarks of masculinity: strength, ambition, fiscal success, physical appearance, etc. But, on a more micro level, these always shift.

For some, loyalty to tradition is a very masculine value. For me, I am more fluid in that I believe we should question everything.

Who is right? Well, neither one of us. We need to be careful when defining masculinity that we are not pushing our values on others, but at the same time, expressing these values in the proper way.

However, you define masculinity; it is likely not a bad thing.

The danger comes when we are so inflexible in our masculinity, that we express these values at the expense of others. Or worse, we are unwilling to consider other values in any way shape or form.

Definitions of masculinity vary, when we stick too firmly to these definitions, however, or practice them without thinking of the harm they might cause to others, we border on the territory of hyper to toxic masculinity, creating a dangerous predicament. The over investment and expression of any value with a clear disregard for circumstances can quickly transform any virtue into a vice.

The key lies in understanding this.

Learning how to be accepting of the values of others.

And having conversations on masculinity.

Ironically enough, one value men often have not been taught that is a traditionally masculine value, is the capability to talk and express vulnerability.

The thing I have found, doing programs on sexual assault prevention, sex positivity, and general masculinity across the country, however, is that men want to talk. We want to talk about masculinity. We want to have conversations on the topic. We want to explore these ideas and figure out what it means to us.

There is no lack of desire to talk about masculinity, from all different student populations, how we do this, however, requires that we create the proper space, use the right tools, and create objectives, so once we leave these conversations, our students and peers feel equipped to continue on their own.

If we do not do this, chances are students will find their ways to discuss masculinity, which while inherently not unhealthy, can be potentially lacking an outcome without direction.

By creating intentional spaces where our peers, classmates, and students can engage in talks on this topic, we are not just offering our campuses an added value. We are providing the space for a conversation that our men want and need. And we are creating paradigm shifts that our society requires.

To learn more about Tim and his masculinity keynote, visit: campuspeak.com/mousseau

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Tips for recruiting and retaining LGBTQ+ students. http://www.campuspeak.com/lgbtqrecruitment/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 19:23:33 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24102   When I was in high school, I remember checking out the college and university brochures, trying to decide which campus looked like the best fit for me. Like many prospective students, I looked at the city or town the campus was located in, the overall vibe of the community, what kinds of activities were […]

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Jeremy Wallace

 

When I was in high school, I remember checking out the college and university brochures, trying to decide which campus looked like the best fit for me. Like many prospective students, I looked at the city or town the campus was located in, the overall vibe of the community, what kinds of activities were available in the surrounding areas, like skiing, hiking, attractions, etc., and finally, I checked out the actual academic programs that the school offered. I may have had my priorities backward, but nevertheless, I had to envision myself living and being comfortable with the entire experience. Even though I wasn’t ‘out’ in regards to my sexual orientation or gender identity, at that time, I still felt the need to choose a school/city that was open-minded.

For LGBTQ+ (especially Trans) students, there is much more to consider when selecting a college. In addition to finding appealing college courses and majors, and an open-minded town, LGBTQ+ students look for indications that the campus culture is safe and inclusive to diverse groups, like themselves. For many students, high school was less than favorable, and they were victims of bullying and anti-LGBTQ+ harassment, so for those who choose to continue their education, it’s imperative to find a campus that welcomes them, as their authentic self. Students need to feel safe and supported emotionally, physically and socially, to succeed.

Here are some tips to effectively recruit and retain LGBTQ+ students, as well as to promote inclusiveness on your campus.


Recruiting Materials

Just as I looked at all the college brochures and campus photographs, so is every other prospective student, and it’s exciting when we see photos of people that look and identify, like ourselves. It makes us feel valued and visible. Having a diverse representation of ALL students on recruiting materials sends a message that this campus welcomes the unique talents of everyone and is proud to be inclusive.


Admissions

After narrowing down the college search, it’s time to apply. This might seem straightforward, but for those students who are transgender, gender non-conforming, or non-binary, it’s not that simple. On the application, there are two choices of gender identity, male or female, but what if you don’t identify as one of those binary options, or your gender identity and your legal identification are not congruent? For me, this predicament always caused a lot of stress and worry, and the very few times I was given additional boxes to choose from, ones that accurately reflected my identity, I was not only relieved but knew that I was in an environment of inclusiveness and was safe to share my true self. And having the option of writing in the name that I preferred to be called, in addition to my legal name, was empowering and made me feel supported. While I understand the legality of using a person’s legal name on the admissions application and school paperwork, allowing a student to clearly state how they identify and which name they want others to use, can be a deciding factor in whether or not they pursue their education. Not to mention, having this information, can help Higher Education institutions to understand LGBTQ+ students and their needs better.

According to the article, The Path Forward: LGBT Retention and Academic Success by Shane Windmeyer (InSightDiversity.com), “LGBT youth, specifically LGB youth of color and transgender youth of all races, are much more likely than other students to struggle academically and personally in college. To positively affect their college experience, institutions must be able to identify these students.” He goes on to say, that, “The lack of questions around LGBT identity on the Common Application makes obtaining this data more difficult, which hinders colleges’ ability to address these students’ retention and success.”

 

Campus Culture & Safety

For those LGBTQ+ students who are admitted and begin their studies on your campus, how are they supported? Many colleges and universities across the US have LGBTQ+ groups, or maybe even an LGBTQ+ Center, that provides resources and support to students, however, that alone isn’t enough. Often, those are peer-led groups, and the responsibility or burden of supporting LGBTQ+ students on campus relies on other ‘Out’ LGBTQ+ students. What is far more efficient for creating a safe, inclusive culture is implementing programs and services for LGBTQ+ students that are fully supported by the school itself. (Campuspride.org) This sets a tone for the entire campus that LGBTQ+ individuals are to be treated and supported equally.

Also, having clear policies and procedures as related to LGBTQ+ student safety, and access to accommodations (facilities, dorms, etc.) is critical. Being pro-active rather than reactive allows for preparation and effective implementation. No one likes the feeling of being unprepared or “caught off guard,” especially the LGBTQ+ student, who may feel their presence on campus is unplanned, unwanted or a burden.

 

Commitment to student success

The one thing to remember when recruiting and retaining ALL students is the responsibility of creating an environment on campus, which supports each student’s ability to learn, graduate and positively affect the world around them.  LGBTQ+ students already face many challenges in living an authentic life. By creating and maintaining a safe, inclusive campus environment, where they feel welcomed and free to express their true identity, will not only increase the number of students wanting to be a part of your school but will give those LGBTQ+ students the best chance at successfully completing their degrees.

To learn more about Jeremy Wallace visit: campuspeak.com/wallace

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WHY and NOW! http://www.campuspeak.com/why-and-now/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 18:18:55 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24088 Your WHY is important, but so is your NOW! You have been hiding under a rock (shameful Geico reference) if you have not heard someone ask about your WHY. It has been made insanely popular by Simon Sinek who focuses on helping organizations and leaders discover their WHY in his latest book. Although Sinek has […]

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JJF blog graphic why now

Your WHY is important, but so is your NOW!

You have been hiding under a rock (shameful Geico reference) if you have not heard someone ask about your WHY. It has been made insanely popular by Simon Sinek who focuses on helping organizations and leaders discover their WHY in his latest book. Although Sinek has made it popular, this question has been a vital issue for a long time. In my most popular presentation and my upcoming book, WHY Matters NOW: How Some Achieve More and Other’s Don’t I challenge you to explore both your WHY and your NOW, as they are of equal importance!

WHY and NOW

 

The WHY:

What is your WHY? No, I am not asking you to look in the mirror and ask, “what is the meaning of life?” I am asking what motivates you.  What is your purpose? What is your intent? What drives you and energizes you? When you understand your WHY, it leads you to make better decisions, to say no more effectively, and persevere when challenges arise. Whether for new students, professionals, or organizational leaders, this question is important. I like to frame it this way. What do you offer/contribute and what is your effect/impact? It’s called the “I AM, SO THAT!” To further clarify it, it can look like “I AM (what you offer/contribute), SO THAT (your effect and impact). Let me give you my example. I AM (inspiring others to take purposeful action), SO THAT (they can achieve authentic results and challenge the boundaries of what they believe is possible). I ask myself what I am doing filtered through this lens. I challenge myself to explore avenues in my life where I can fulfill this, but what about you?

What is your Macro WHY? I say Macro because I believe we have Micro WHYs. The Macro is the big WHY that guides and governs us, but the Micro are the specific areas in our lives like working out, going to school, being a leader, getting healthy, etc.? When we uncover our true WHY it permeates to all the other areas of our lives. For example, when I work out, I usually choose things that allow me to challenge the boundaries of what I believe is possible. Like CrossFit and running a marathon. (I ran my first one last April, or should I say mainly ran, well ran and walked, well I finished!) When you know your WHY, it focuses what organizations you will be a part of, and how you live out the values in your organization! But it’s not just about the WHY; it is also about your NOW!


The NOW:

A synonym for NOW is passion. Not the type of passion where you are passionate about something, but rather the effort or intensity that you put into something. Have you ever been to a wedding, party, or formal?  Aren’t there usually two different type of dancers? One type of dancer is dancing very carefully in order not to break a sweat. They are so concerned what others are thinking of them, and they dance slowly.  Then there is another type of dancer that is giving it everything they have, and they brought three t-shirts because they knew they were going to sweat each one out. They are what I call, “ON 10!”  When you are “ON 10” you give everything you have, you are not as concerned about what people think about you because you want to give it your all! You realize that this moment is vitally important and you don’t want to waste it. If you had to rate yourself on a scale from 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how passionately are you living your life right now? Be very careful not to have “ON 10” comparisons, because your 10 is different than mine. What are your “ON 10” behaviors in your organizations, at school, and with your relationships? Do you see how vital this piece is?

The WHY and the NOW:

You need both the WHY and the NOW! I have found in my research that If you are mainly WHY oriented, you are a dreamer, thinker, and take little to no action. You understand your motivation and purpose, but for whatever reason, you are not passionately pursuing it. If you are mainly NOW oriented, you are impulsive, rush to make decisions, and may confuse activity with progress. You give great effort, but sometimes in the wrong places. WE NEED BOTH a great WHY and a great NOW! How will you live your WHY, NOW?

Practical Actions:

  1. Write our Macro WHY statement using the “I AM, SO THAT” formula. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but you should try. If you are having some trouble shoot me an email at Justin@justininspires.com and I will help you.
  2. Identify what it looks like for you to be “ON 10” at school, work, your organizations, and in your life. Start challenging yourself to exhibit “ON 10” behaviors more often and have a close friend hold you accountable.
  3. Ask yourself what is something good that you have to let go of, to make room for the great. For example, I gave up a weekly FM radio show to give more time to researching, speaking, and consulting.

 

Justin has great leadership strategies embedded in his keynote.  Whether you are looking for leadership, diversity, or purpose driven inspiration, check out Justin and his ability to intersect amazing energy and practical content. Trust me, look at one of his videos!!!

Check out Justin’s most requested Keynotes WHY Matters NOW: How Purpose and Passion Inspire Meaningful Success and see why Justin was named as a “HOT ACT” in 2015 by Campus Activities Magazine.

Learn more about Justin: campuspeak.com/jones-fosu

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I spent 24-hours of my honeymoon playing soccer with Syrian refugees. http://www.campuspeak.com/honeymoon/ Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:29:20 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23944 Ethan Zohn won a million dollars on the TV show Survivor and put the money to good use. As a philanthropist, entrepreneur and college speaker, Ethan dedicates his time to helping others in need and educating his audiences on how they can make a difference. Read his most recent article about how he and his wife […]

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Ethan Zohn

Ethan Zohn won a million dollars on the TV show Survivor and put the money to good use. As a philanthropist, entrepreneur and college speaker, Ethan dedicates his time to helping others in need and educating his audiences on how they can make a difference. Read his most recent article about how he and his wife spent their honeymoon making a positive impact: I spent 24-hours of my honeymoon playing soccer with Syrian refugees.

Learn more about speaker Ethan Zohn and his story: campuspeak.com/zohn.

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Building a legacy through leadership and service. http://www.campuspeak.com/legacyleader/ Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:22:45 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23906 Service is an integral part of leadership. Not only do student leaders have the opportunity to inspire and guide their fellow students. They can also model the importance of serving our communities, and giving to those in need. Someone who modeled this for me was my mother. Here is a story about her: It was […]

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Elaine Penn

Service is an integral part of leadership. Not only do student leaders have the opportunity to inspire and guide their fellow students. They can also model the importance of serving our communities, and giving to those in need.

Someone who modeled this for me was my mother. Here is a story about her:

It was 1990, and I was sitting in the auditorium of my old high school waiting for the show to begin. The lights flickered on and off letting the audience know there were 5 minutes left to the start of the production of Music Music Music. We sat there in great anticipation. Finally, the lights dimmed, the curtains opened, and the audience erupted into applause. Up on the stage were 30 adults with down syndrome, decked out in full costumes, ready to perform their lip-sync number to the song Delta Dawn.

This was the fundraiser my mother had produced for many years for a group called the DDA, (Developmentally Disabled Adults of Rockingham County). My mother worked with the DDA from 1985 to 2011, when she retired.

My mom was the Director of Parks and Recreation in Madison, North Carolina, the small town where I grew up. She had gone back to college when she was 40 years old to major in Therapeutic Recreation. She vowed that went she graduated and got a job; she would hold a special place in her heart for anyone with a disability. And she did!

Each month, as the Director of Parks and Recreation, she offered a program for the DDA. Sometimes it was a Scavenger Hunt. Other times, it was an Elvis Party. (They LOVED Elvis). It could be a dance or a prom. But their favorite program was Music Music Music.

Their parents would make their costumes, and they would rehearse their lines. You would have thought it was a Broadway production. The entire town was “abuzz.”

Every year, my mother would have a cast party after Music Music Music, that was often more entertaining as the show itself. During one cast party, in particular, one of the cast members (of the DDA) went missing. His name was Jimmy, and no one could find him.

I lived in an old three story house with an attic and a basement. We were worried, to say the least.

Eventually, my mother looked into her and my father’s bedroom. As she approached the door, she saw Jimmy standing in front of her mirror. He was surrounded by a pile of her evening gowns. (We had a family jazz band, and those were her costumes). Jimmy had been trying them on one at a time, and looking at himself in the mirror.

My mother stood there for a few moments, smiling at Jimmy. Eventually, she said, “Jimmy, you look dazzling.” Then, she gently escorted him back to the party. My mother greatly enriched their lives. My mother served the DDA.

This is just one example of how my mother taught me the importance of service. She was (and is) a tremendous leader. She built a thriving Parks and Recreation Department that met an entire community’s needs through her programs, services, and activities. She always took the time to inspire and teach her staff, connect with community members; and, bring people together to rally around a common vision. The Recreation Department was the heartbeat of the town.

My mother also gave back to the community that gave so much to her. She helped those in need and supported underrepresented populations. She made everyone feel valuable and important.

My mother built a legacy, and the lessons she taught us will live on forever. She served. She led.

In what ways are you building your legacy? How can you and your organization serve and give back? This is a question that every leader should be asking themselves.

Learn more about speaker Elaine Penn, check out campuspeak.com/penn.

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Words Make a Difference http://www.campuspeak.com/words/ Tue, 21 Feb 2017 20:38:04 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23876   Recognizing people is one the most important parts of being a leader, and it’s also one of my favorite parts. Praising and complimenting others has always come naturally to me, and I love making people feel good about themselves. But the first time I remember my positive words really making an impact on someone […]

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Kristen Hadeed

 

Recognizing people is one the most important parts of being a leader, and it’s also one of my favorite parts. Praising and complimenting others has always come naturally to me, and I love making people feel good about themselves. But the first time I remember my positive words really making an impact on someone was soon after I started a cleaning company when I was in college.

It was in the middle of what we call “move-out season,” which takes place in the dead of summer. I was leading a large team at an apartment complex, where we were tasked with cleaning about 100 units that day. My company is based in Gainesville, Florida, so as you can imagine, it’s Really. Freaking. Hot. Add that to cleaning empty apartments where people have lived for years—sometimes without cleaning them at all—and you’ve got a recipe for misery. To get my team through the move-out season, it takes a lot of encouragement.

I was making my rounds to each apartment, delivering water to teams and thanking them for working so hard. In one of the units I visited, two students were working together in a kitchen.

I greeted them and handed them each a water bottle. Then I consulted my list and realized there should be another person in the apartment.

“Isn’t there someone else with you?” I asked.

“Yeah,” one of the students said. “He’s… down that way, cleaning one of the bathrooms.”

The way she said it made me think something was up, so I set off down the hallway. When I reached the bathroom, I looked through a doorway at Bill, who was cleaning a toilet the slowest I’d ever seen anyone clean anything in my life. He was standing hunched over, his toilet brush dangling from his hand, barely moving.

“Bill! How are you doing?” I asked cheerfully, hoping it might startle him into action.

No such luck. When he looked up at me, he was pale. He was sweating and had big bags under his eyes like he hadn’t slept in days. To my horror, I noticed a dead roach sitting on his sneaker. He didn’t even see it. He looked so utterly exhausted that I was surprised he was still standing—and that he hadn’t quit yet.

Not knowing what else to do, I looked at the other two students who had wandered over to us.

“Guys,” I whispered, hoping Bill wouldn’t hear me. “What should we do?”

They looked at one another, then back at me, and shrugged.

We needed Bill. We were in the middle of a do-or-die day with a big deadline fast approaching; I had to do something to motivate him.

“Man, Bill!” I shouted, not sure what I was going to say next. “I have never seen anyone clean a toilet as well as you!” (Faster, yes. But he at least seemed to be cleaning it thoroughly).

Caught off-guard, Bill looked up and lazily half-smiled.

I looked at the other two students, raising my eyebrows and silently urging them to follow my lead.

“Oh! Um, yeah, Bill! Wow!” one piped up, catching on. “Where did you learn how to clean toilets?”

“Seriously, Bill, you’re the man!” the other chimed in.

Bill was slowly perking up. He’d even cracked a grin.

“Bill for president!” one of them shouted. Probably a little overkill, but Bill loved it. He started standing up a little straighter, the color returned to his face, and he was smiling like he had just come back from a five-day cruise to the Bahamas. He still didn’t notice the roach on his sneaker, but he started pumping his toilet brush in the air as the rest of us chanted, “Bill! Bill! Bill!”

As I left that apartment, I spotted Bill, grin still in place, scrubbing that toilet with gusto—and probably a little more than the job required. When I checked in with him and his team later that day, he was still going strong. I realized I was smiling, too. It felt so good to see that change in Bill and realizing that the little bit of cheerleading his teammates and I did had made such a huge difference.

People thrive on positive recognition, and it’s up to leaders to provide it. Encouraging people makes them want to work harder and do better, so really, it’s a win-win: You feel good for making others feel good, and in turn, they want to continue doing things that earn them good feedback.

But there’s a sweet spot for giving recognition. If it’s given too often, it becomes meaningless. And if it’s not given often enough, it’s not nearly as effective. Studies show that to have the biggest impact, the ratio of positive to negative feedback should be 5 to 1. That means someone needs to get positive recognition five times as often as they get negative or critical feedback.

So, the next time you want to motivate your members, try a little cheerleading. And it doesn’t have to happen in an awards ceremony or even in front of a crowd: Giving out awards is great, but it’s the everyday recognition that makes a difference.

Learn more about speaker Kristen Hadeed, check out campuspeak.com/hadeed.

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Fill Their Bucket http://www.campuspeak.com/bucket/ Tue, 21 Feb 2017 18:51:23 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23847   As a student of leadership, I’m always looking for pragmatic concepts that I can add to my toolbox, and especially ones that I can incorporate into my keynote speeches. Enter Child Psychology 101. My wife and I have two kids. Roman is four and Sylvia is two. We love them to death, and in […]

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Jon Tasch

 

As a student of leadership, I’m always looking for pragmatic concepts that I can add to my toolbox, and especially ones that I can incorporate into my keynote speeches.

Enter Child Psychology 101.

My wife and I have two kids. Roman is four and Sylvia is two. We love them to death, and in our minds, they truly are our little angels. But sometimes, as you might imagine, they don’t always demonstrate angelic behavior.

Up until recently, well, let’s just say they were in the habit of displaying remarkably “spirited” behavior. My wife’s and my patience was pushed to the limit, and we arrived at a point where we both agreed we needed some professional help.

We made a beeline for the Google search bar and found a child behavioral expert who bases her methodology on what is known as Adlerian Psychology. One of her premises is that if you want well-behaved children, you must satisfy their need for attention and power.

At the end of her one-hour webinar, we were sold on the promise that inside her magic box lay all the secrets for putting an end to all of that undesired negative behavior, of which our kids seemed to have an endless supply. She had shown us the light, and we were ready for her six-week course.

Early on in the program, we learned that children (1) don’t experience an adequate amount of attention and (2) don’t feel empowered, through no fault of their own, they act out in the only ways they know how, usually in the form of temper tantrums, whining, and innumerable other ways that have caused my wife and I to lose our (insert expletive) on more occasions than we care to admit.

Children are instinctively smart. They know that when they act out, they are likely to be awarded a whole bunch of attention, and it usually arrives rather quickly. Attention bucket filled.

And when they don’t get what they want or are given demanding orders – when they don’t feel empowered – their fits of rage are often neutralized with whatever it is they wanted (the candy, the toy, the extra 30 minutes of TV time, etc.). Power bucket filled.

Simply put, children want to have a say in things, and they want to feel significant. After going through the training, I’m happy to say that my wife and I have learned strategies to prevent meltdowns by filling their attention and power buckets in healthy positive ways.

As adults, we are no different than children in our need for attention and power. We crave these things just as much as they do. My time as a military officer and as an FBI Agent taught me that. The difference though is how we behave when we don’t experience adequate amounts of attention or power.

Think about it from an organizational perspective.

When we don’t feel empowered, and when we aren’t recognized for our effort and contribution (no matter how small), instead of temper tantrums and whining fits, as adults we become apathetic, disengaged, and do just enough to get by.

As a leader, it is your job to help the people around you become a better version of themselves. When you fill their attention and power buckets, you give them an invaluable gift and, in turn, you give your organization one as well.

When we feel like we have a say in things and that what we do matters, we will go above and beyond and put our heart and soul into whatever it is that we are doing. I challenge you to be the type of leader who gives people the opportunity to do that.

Learn more about keynote speaker Jon Tasch visit: campuspeak.com/tasch.

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The Power of Belonging http://www.campuspeak.com/powerbelonging/ Fri, 17 Feb 2017 18:45:46 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23813       Over the last four years, I have engaged in an in-depth inquiry into the nature of fraternal brotherhood and sisterhood. I have learned a great deal about the fraternal experience in those four years, and have published and presented research that I think represents a fundamental shift in focus for those of us […]

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Gentry McCreary

 

Over the last four years, I have engaged in an in-depth inquiry into the nature of fraternal brotherhood and sisterhood. I have learned a great deal about the fraternal experience in those four years, and have published and presented research that I think represents a fundamental shift in focus for those of us working in the fraternity/sorority industry.

Of all that we have learned, one finding stands out above the others: a brotherhood or sisterhood based on belonging – a feeling of connectedness and mattering – is the single most important aspect of the fraternal experience.

In our research, we have quantitatively studied over 30,000 fraternity and sorority members, and have engaged in in-depth qualitative analysis, hearing from fraternity and sorority members themselves about the experiences that shape their feelings of brotherhood and sisterhood. And those students have resoundingly stated, over and over again, in their own words and in their answers to survey questions, that a feeling of belonging is of paramount importance.

Belonging is the single most powerful predictor of retention in fraternities and sororities. It is the single most important predictor of overall satisfaction with the fraternity/sorority experience. It is the single most important predictor of organizational commitment and attachment. And belonging is the key that opens the door to the most altruistic versions of brotherhood and sisterhood – a drive to hold one another to high standards and to strive together to achieve greatness. Show me a chapter with retention issues, motivation issues, or involvement issues, and I’ll show you a chapter with belonging issues. The importance of a brotherhood or sisterhood based on belonging cannot be overstated.

But as I have studied and talked with fraternity and sorority members across the country, I have reached a troubling conclusion – the vast majority of our undergraduate chapters do not actively or consciously work towards creating a sense of belonging to their members. Even in chapters that measure high on belonging, we often see the haphazard nature of the connections within the group. Only the very best fraternities and sororities are actively working, in every aspect of chapter life, to create that sense of belonging among members.

Luckily, we have studied those groups who make strides towards creating a sense of belonging. We understand how they recruit. We understand how they organize their new member education programs. We know the types of brotherhood and sisterhood activities they host, how they socialize, and how they hold one another accountable. In our qualitative study of the “best” fraternities and sororities nationally, we have gleaned lessons that I am now ready to share with fraternity and sorority everywhere.

My new keynote program, “The Power of Belonging” is the culmination of this research. In it, I help students understand the importance of belonging, and provide them with powerful and effective strategies aimed at creating a stronger sense of belonging in their chapters. In doing so, I help fraternity and sorority members rethink their approaches recruitment, new member education, accountability, brother/sisterhood programming. The result? Students will leave this program with a fresh perspective on what matters in fraternity and sorority, motivated to refocus their efforts on the creation of belonging, and equipped with tried-and-true strategies to build a stronger sense of belonging among their members.

The importance of belonging cannot be overstated. It is the single most important aspect of the fraternal experience, and “The Power of Belonging” may be the single most important message the students in your community need to hear.

Learn more about keynote speaker, Gentry McCreary and his new keynote: campuspeak.com/mccreary.

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I cannot make you change. But I can change me. http://www.campuspeak.com/change/ Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:26:57 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23684     “If only my spouse/child/parent/boss would change…” To focus our attention on what we can’t control produces suffering. You and I have limited resources. We have finite time, energy and attention. When we expend those resources on what is beyond our control, suffering ensues. That suffering is a sign. It means we’re out of […]

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Joel Nunez

 

 

“If only my spouse/child/parent/boss would change…”

To focus our attention on what we can’t control produces suffering.

You and I have limited resources. We have finite time, energy and attention. When we expend those resources on what is beyond our control, suffering ensues. That suffering is a sign. It means we’re out of balance with the natural order of things. It means we’re not harnessing our limited resources towards doing what we can do because we’ve opted to focus on what we cannot do.

I cannot make you change. But I can change me. Often, that’s enough to ease my suffering.

Every week, I meet with courageous people in the therapy room. People from all walks of life who are struggling to overcome challenges impeding them from becoming their best selves. Too many have been the victims of unspeakable abuse, neglect, or crimes they did nothing to merit. For these folks, empowerment comes from the paradoxical truth that although what happened to them long ago was not their fault, today they have the moral responsibility to assume ownership over the effects of their earlier trauma. Then, no longer are they passive victims, but can begin to forge a new meaning from their experiences and chart a new path of their choosing.

What happened to me yesterday may not have been my fault. What do I do with today is my responsibility.

Be well.
Joel

Learn more about speaker Dr. Joel Núñez, check out campuspeak.com/nunez.

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The Perfect Love Affair #PLA http://www.campuspeak.com/loveaffair/ Wed, 08 Feb 2017 14:40:19 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23644       “Love is patient, and love is kind…” or so the story is told. There is a moment when you think about your personal love, and sometimes it leads to warm fuzzy moments or cold realities of the bad decisions you have made in your lifetime. We often find ourselves waiting for someone […]

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Sara Lowery

 

“Love is patient, and love is kind…” or so the story is told.

There is a moment when you think about your personal love, and sometimes it leads to warm fuzzy moments or cold realities of the bad decisions you have made in your lifetime.

We often find ourselves waiting for someone to say how much they like us, or even how much they love us. But sometimes the voice that we need to hear to say those things belongs to us. Why do we find ourselves waiting on others to acknowledge our existence when we may have walked by five mirrors and didn’t acknowledge ourselves?

I know this may be too deep, especially if you just stumbled across this article while eating your morning Cheerios. However, I have a responsibility to share with some and remind others. Does the love affair that you seek, start with yourself first? Loving yourself first is what I call the PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR! No one is going to love you better than you. No one is going to encourage, motivate and inspire you to stay strong more than you can.

I know that this may cause you to be a bit vulnerable. However, this is what creates inner strength. Brené Brown says it best:

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”

You’ve heard this before, but allow me to reintroduce you to this phrase – You can’t worry about the haters. You have to be prepared to lead your haters. Hence the reason that self-love is so important. When you can be vulnerable and love yourself, you can become vulnerable, with others, and when others see that vulnerability, their trust in you will be established. Then, friends, we have the making of a great leader! Trust me. I prescribe to this medicine of vulnerability – I take it at least three times daily, and I know I am getting stronger.

Want to start your regiment? Here are the directions for this medication. Each morning you should be able to look in the mirror (preferably before you wash your face and get dressed for the day), say and do the following:

  1. “Oh, how I love me some me.” Then, give yourself a huge smile.
  2. “I am valuable.” As you get stronger, list ways in which you are valuable.
  3. “I woke up this morning because I have a purpose.”
  4. “Someone needs me today, and it may only be my smile, but even this gorgeous smile can turn a frown upside-down.”

At first, this may seem silly, and you might feel silly doing it. Some of you may not get past just staring at yourself. And for those that can’t face the mirror right now, I understand. It was a process for me before I could look in the mirror and say that I love me some me. Write your thoughts, feelings, and experiences in a journal, then move to a Post-it®, then graduate to sticking Post-its® to a mirror. Before you know it, you will be saying them out loud to yourself each day.

Sometimes life situations have a way of beating us down. Trust me; I have been there! But we have to fight back and take control in our internal so that our external can be accurate and authentic, kind and compassionate. We want our external, the person that others see – to be inspirational, to portray us as a motivated leader that helps others, and show that we are supportive and encouraging. The only way that can happen is if we start that PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR with ourselves.

Check me out on Instagram and Twitter and inspire others and share with me your PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR, #PLA @saraempowers_u.

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Sara Lowery and her keynotes: campuspeak.com/lowery.

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How to Mistake Your Way to Your Best Self http://www.campuspeak.com/bestself/ Mon, 06 Feb 2017 20:08:44 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23625 It’s pretty uncommon these days for anyone to encourage you to make a mistake, let alone celebrate one. A mistake is considered to be the opposite of a success and therefore something to be avoided in our success-focused culture. But what if I told you that it’s not so simple – that mistakes are crucial for […]

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Brady Gill
It’s pretty uncommon these days for anyone to encourage you to make a mistake, let alone celebrate one. A mistake is considered to be the opposite of a success and therefore something to be avoided in our success-focused culture. But what if I told you that it’s not so simple – that mistakes are crucial for your personal growth and that avoiding mistakes is the best way to keep you from being your most successful self? What would you do? How would you live a life where mistakes were marvelous?

First off, you have to believe that mistakes are great!

We have spent most of our lives being told to avoid mistakes. Almost every test we take in school sends that message. If you want a good grade, don’t make any mistakes. A good grade is considered the key to a good school, which is the key to a good job, which is our key to a good life. Anything that derails that imaginary path is a bad thing. But take some time to think about your life when you learned the most about yourself and others. Did they come from easy successes? Or did they come from epic fails? Perhaps it was the success you found after the trials, obstacles, and mistakes you had to experience to get there? My guess is it was the latter.

Mistakes have changed the world for the better!

All you have to do is look back in history to see all the mistakes that we benefit from today. The microwave was invented because Percy Spencer was trying to create a new vacuum tube. He noticed that by mistake, he was also melting a candy bar in his pocket. One dirty shirt ended up meaning microwaves for all! Not a fan of Hot Pockets? How about penicillin? While working with bacteria, Alexander Fleming found that one of his Petri dishes was contaminated with mold. But one failed experiment led to the start of something amazing when the mold seemed to counteract the present bacteria. If Fleming were being tested, he would have failed. But instead, he invented modern antibiotics! Now your mistakes might not lead to inventions that will change the world, but they will teach you things that can change your life.

Stop being afraid to make mistakes!

We hear it all the time, “take the road less traveled,” and “think outside the box,” when we apply to schools and for jobs where we want to “stand out” and be “different from the rest.” That’s hard to do when you’re scared of making mistakes. It’s the fear of mistakes that keeps us from trying new things or taking risks. Our bodies have evolved to keep us safe. Anytime we think we’re in danger; our bodies flush with adrenaline and hormones that are designed to make us FIGHT or FLIGHT. Neither of these reactions are necessary when you’re trying to sing karaoke, or just admitting to someone that you have no idea what they are talking about, but you’d like to learn. The more we can train ourselves to be less scared of our mistakes, the more courageous and confident we’ll be in the world.

Celebrate mistakes and make them often.

I’m not saying that you should go out of your way to mess up. Don’t intentionally crash your car or cheat on your partner because you’re gonna learn something from it. But just knowing that mistakes can be positive will free us from many of our inhibitions. Here are some ways that you can start “mistaking” your way to your best self.

  • Be reflective. When you make a mistake, take the time to think about what you can learn from it. Sometimes this won’t be clear right away, and that’s okay. It took me years to learn from the mistakes that I made in my last relationship, but now I’m grateful for what I know now. Some great ways to make sure you’re reflecting is to start a regular journal writing practice or put up a prompt somewhere in your home that asks you to think about what mistakes you’ve made recently and what you’re learning.
  • Be generous and share. We tend to hide our mistakes because we believe they are embarrassing or make us weak. If mistakes are as wonderful as we say they are, then why shouldn’t we share them with the world? By being open about mistakes, you’re normalizing them both for yourself and for those you share them with. Our mistakes then stop being so scary and everyone gets to benefit from them.
  • Be playful. Almost any game you play is an exercise in making mistakes and learning from them. Whether it’s on a soccer field or playing a board game, playing is a constant form of improv, and small-stakes risk taking. It’s the reason that most intelligent animals play when they’re young. And if games aren’t your thing, there are lots of ways to play. Rockclimbing, creative writing, even organizing your bedroom can be a form of play as long as you make it fun and engaging.

Imagine your playful life where mistakes are celebrated. What would you finally try that you never have? Who’s that person that you would finally talk to? Who would you get to be? While the answer for each of us is different, many of the results are the same. A more dynamic life, where creativity and innovation flow with ease. A life where we are more curious and open with those around us. Life with less fear and more LIFE! It’s the life I’d like to live, and I hope you would too.

So let’s start making mistakes together and see where we can go!

 

Learn more about speaker Brady Gill and how to bring him to campus: http://www.campuspeak.com/gill.

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Selling is Synonymous with Success http://www.campuspeak.com/selling/ Mon, 06 Feb 2017 18:46:53 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23619     “I do not have the personality to be a great salesperson.” I may be the first one to tell you this, but personally believing in that statement can be a major hindrance to your personal and business progression. Out of every ten salespeople that you meet, two usually have the personality of a […]

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Kinja Dixon

 

“I do not have the personality to be a great salesperson.”

I may be the first one to tell you this, but personally believing in that statement can be a major hindrance to your personal and business progression. Out of every ten salespeople that you meet, two usually have the personality of a great salesperson. The ones that we usually run into are the other eight, and unfortunately, until the message from this article spreads to the general public, the stereotypes that come with the personality of a salesperson will continue to push possible buyers away. These traits include:

  • aggressive
  • over-talkers
  • impatient
  • not genuine
  • egotistical

Those are just a few, but these are usually characteristics that someone who agreed with my opening statement is thinking about when assessing the personality type os a salesperson. The previous traits are not only unproductive for someone in sales, but also for anyone in life.

What Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Andrew Carnegie, and Henry Ford have in common is that they were some of the greatest salesmen who have ever lived. The ideas that they persuaded others to buy into had a generational impact that has had an effect on the way we all live today. The mindset of a great salesperson involves understanding human behavior that they demonstrate through their passionate delivery of their message.

What the average person deals with is the total opposite when it comes to sales. They deal with an overly assumptive person who usually does not allow proper communication, and those types of experiences cause the buyer to carry defenses into future encounters with salespeople. The great salesperson recognizes and addresses the defense while aiming to get on a positive track, while the eighty percent fight fire with fire, leaving yet another bad impression on the title os a salesperson and the cycle continues.

When you buy an idea, product or service from someone that used the correct techniques, you feel as if you’re on a pedestal. The pride of making a wise decision, mixed with the genuine connection what made, is one of the best combinations of emotions that one could ever have. Having a personality geared to deliver these feelings benefits every person involved in the exchange.

Once you take a closer look at the personality type of a great salesperson, you will immediately understand that the traits instilled will help attain success in anything you will ever do. The vast majority of any sales force that you run into lacks these characteristics because of the intent to “make a sale,” eliminates the focus on the skills that are needed to help them strive for true mastery of the art of entrepreneurship.

These are a few of the traits that come with the master salesperson:

  • enthusiastic
  • great listener
  • optimistic
  • goal-oriented
  • confident

The person who can sell him or herself will be much better as selling others, so it all starts with knowing how to be self-motivated. The individuals in this world who encounter the worst physical, financial and emotional trauma are usually victims of not being able to sell themselves on their first presentation because they did not execute the proper action. Now that you have a better understanding of what comes with the character of a great salesperson, I urge that you take a closer look at who you are and what type of foundation your personality is built upon.

Kinja Dixon is an internationally award-winning sales management expert and motivational speaker. In 2013, Dixon won both the Gold Stevie Award and American Resort Development Association Award (ARDA) for Top In-House Salesperson, making him one of the most accomplished salespeople alive today. In Universal Talk Laws: How to Increase Your Net Worth With Words, Dixon offers practical advice on the art of verbal communication. For more information, visit www.kinjadixon.com.

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Kinja Dixon and how to bring him to campus: campuspeak.com/dixon.

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Leadership Misconceptions: How Extraordinary Leaders Inspire and Lead Differently http://www.campuspeak.com/misconceptions/ Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:27:06 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23525   Leadership is… action, not position. transformation, not a transaction. influence, not management. a verb, not a noun. Whether I am speaking to student audiences or corporate organizations, the challenges and frustrations I hear leaders talk about have common threads. The seasoned executive and department manager are very likely dealing with many of the same […]

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Kevin Snyder

Leadership is…

action, not position.
transformation, not a transaction.
influence, not management.
a verb, not a noun.

Whether I am speaking to student audiences or corporate organizations, the challenges and frustrations I hear leaders talk about have common threads. The seasoned executive and department manager are very likely dealing with many of the same issues as the student leader.

“Others just don’t seem to care as much.”
“If only people did what they said they’d do!”
“Why can’t we get more people involved?”
“20% of us are doing 80% of the work!”
etc., etc.

The good news is there are solutions to whatever your frustrations might be. Of course, circumstances are unique for each of us, but leadership principles are universal and span across an age and industry. As long as a leader recognizes the specific changes they desire and are needed, there are ways to make that reality come to life. That’s what effective leaders do. They have a reality check to assess and recognize where they are and then they work with others to get where he/she/they want to be. Where they want to be is a clear vision that they communicate and hold themselves accountable to work toward.

Spoiler Alert! This one article won’t solve all the world’s problems, but it can help us get started. I’ll be diving deeper into what I believe is the most important concept that will help you tackle and work through any challenge you are currently facing. Whether you want to improve your organization, a relationship, or yourself, apply this one principle to begin the journey.

“Remember, it’s not what you know, it’s what you apply.”

Important: Even before the journey begins, leaders know getting to their destination will have its detours, speed bumps, and even unanticipated construction zones. But effective leaders know they will never reach their destination if they take the nearest exit. Leaders finish despite adversity and setbacks. That’s why they are leaders. When other people quit, they don’t. They know their struggles develop their strength. They know setbacks are a setup for an opportunity.

Most of what I’ve learned about effective leadership over the past 20 years hasn’t come from books. In fact, much of what I’ve read about leadership centers around misconceptions. That’s why, in real life, leadership is so tough. Leadership isn’t always fun. Leadership isn’t about what we want to do, rather, it’s about what we ought to do. This is why most people who think they are good at leadership, unfortunately, aren’t. Most people don’t realize what leadership is about until they step into it – literally. Let’s change those misconceptions… so keep reading.

If you’re like me, I learn by doing – not reading. Most of my leadership discoveries have come from my experience speaking to over 500,000 people across 1,150 organizations in all 50 states and numerous countries. I’ve written a few books and been honored to do my own TEDx talk. Through my travels, observations, research, and discussions with people all over the world, I’m more clear than ever before about how an extraordinary leader can inspire and lead differently, and more effectively. These personal experiences have helped me discover that there’s one concept that will melt away the misconceptions about leadership. It seems simple in concept, but I assure you that it’s profound in application. Here it is:

Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. They set expectations.

That’s correct. Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. Instead, extraordinary leaders create a vision of expectation for themselves and others.

Goals are passive aggressive. Goals are a statement of what most people “hope” will happen. The majority of time when someone, or an organization, sets a goal, they like the sound of it. They even believe in it during the moment, but they don’t really understand what a goal requires legs, a body, a heart and even heartache. A goal also needs to be nourished and curated for months, if not years. That’s the reason why six months later 85% of most goals are either forgotten about or never achieved. New Year’s resolutions function the same way.

On the other hand, extraordinary leaders create a vision of expectation. Think about the people who have changed the world, created remarkable inventions and inspired others to greatness. Think of extraordinary athletes, famous authors and advocates for a cause.

Expecting what you desire is the first step toward obtaining it.

You see, when you have an authentic vision for something. It’s very clear in your mind. It’s as if you’ve already achieved it and you expect it to manifest it in your life. But you also know you’ve got to work toward it and never, ever, ever quit. Success should be more about making progress and being happy along the way. How often have you achieved something and then you look around asking, “Now what?”

A few years ago, I was sharing this leadership perspective with a group of fraternity and sorority student leaders during a Greek Week event. Apparently, word spread after my speech and I was asked to share my “idea” at a TEDX event. If you’re like me and you’d rather watch a TED talk than read about it, simply click here to watch. You won’t hurt my feelings. Plus, you’ll get to watch my Price is Right video when I shake Bob Barker’s hand and live my dream of being on the show. That was my vision and expectation years ago.

Here’s the bottom line… I want you to just realize that goals are phrases that look really good on a piece of paper. It’s okay to have them, and you should. Perhaps they can even motivate you for a short period of time, but they’ll soon fade out. A piece of paper with numbers and bullet points isn’t motivating. That document isn’t going to inspire anyone. What’s motivating is knowing that you’re leading, and following others at times, toward achieving a vision. You and your team literally expect that the vision will come to life and you talk about it often. It’s also expected that everyone will work toward it. It’s expected that others will have a role to play so they feel invested in helping obtain it. Make sense?

Instead of making a goal for yourself and your organizations, create a vision of expectation. Perhaps take it to the next level and create a vision board. What is it that will really inspire, ignite and empower others? That’s your vision of expectation! Share that instead of a goal document. Then work backwards. You’ll be amazed at the difference. If you’d like to learn more about how to make a vision board, or how to facilitate this with organizations, contact me. I also have a chapter in my book dedicated to this visioning process and you can get a free copy.

Download your free copy of my book, Think Differently to Achieve Success, by simply visiting my website: KevinCSnyder.com. Enter your email and you’ll receive a message to automatically download my book. Over 25,000 copies have been delivered and I hope you’re next.

Kevin Snyder

I also have a leadership app you can download for free on your phone or iPad. Simply visit your app store and search for KevinCSnyder.

In closing, remember this – extraordinary leaders do not accept “no” for an answer. Instead, they only hear “not yet” or “not this way.” Due to their clear vision, they learn from each mistake and obstacle instead of giving up or believing that someone else is in charge of their destiny. Like a seed, they persist until circumstances become favorable and then grow through the concrete.

Many times in life, and for no other reason, you will be successful because others will quit, you will not. The clarity of your vision alone will dictate your success. Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. They set expectations.

To read more leadership blog articles by Kevin Snyder, click the titles below:

The Common Denominator of Success
How to Bounce Back from Failure
The Jim Carrey Graduation Speech
The Power of Perspective

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Dr. Kevin Snyder and his story: campuspeak.com/snyder

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Release Self-Neglect and Love Yourself in Action http://www.campuspeak.com/loveyourself/ Tue, 24 Jan 2017 20:38:18 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23497     When it comes to moving toward more fierce loving of your own body, speaker and founder of bodyheart, Amber Krzys is an expert. She recently sat down for a podcast with Sexyfit to talk about the importance of creating a positive body image that will help carry out more meaningful New Year’s resolutions. You can […]

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Amber Krzys

 

When it comes to moving toward more fierce loving of your own body, speaker and founder of bodyheart, Amber Krzys is an expert. She recently sat down for a podcast with Sexyfit to talk about the importance of creating a positive body image that will help carry out more meaningful New Year’s resolutions.

You can hear the podcast episode here.

Learn more about keynote speaker Amber Krzys and her story: campuspeak.com/krzys

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