CAMPUSPEAK http://www.campuspeak.com Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:09:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.7 99955535 Why We Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month http://www.campuspeak.com/whywecelebrate/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 15:01:08 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=26057 By: Saul Flores, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker Why We Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month From our sandy shores to our brightly colored homes, our heritage is rooted in a diaspora of cultures that are spread across Latin America. We celebrate Hispanic Heritage month to encourage students to remember where they came from, where they are, and where they will […]

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By: Saul Flores, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker

Why We Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

From our sandy shores to our brightly colored homes, our heritage is rooted in a diaspora of cultures that are spread across Latin America. We celebrate Hispanic Heritage month to encourage students to remember where they came from, where they are, and where they will go. We look into our past to understand our future, and to discover the great potential we have as students from immigrant backgrounds.

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Where we’re from.

Latin America is a kaleidoscope of 21 countries, with hundreds of cultures and influences from around the world. Our diverse heritage spans the glistening lakes of Guatemala, the trembling volcanoes of Nicaragua, the highest peaks of Colombia, and the dry deserts of Mexico. In Guatemala, you will find rich and vibrant textiles. In Argentina, you will dance to the rhythms of tango and hear the echoes of ancient folk music. Across every Latin American nation, you will find a unique blend of tradition, community, and pride.

Where we are.

In today’s shifting political climate, it is common to see our Latino, Latina, and Latinx students facing challenges such as fear, uncertainty, and instability. Policy changes continue to contribute added pressures for members of our community who have worked tirelessly for an opportunity. Recent changes to immigration policies are separating families, alienating communities, and affecting students from immigrant backgrounds. These shifts in climate are making it increasingly difficult for students to focus, be confident in their abilities, and remain ambitious toward reaching their dreams.

Where we’ll go.

Despite the challenges, our communities continue to persevere and our students remain more hopeful than ever. Our students celebrate the life of leaders like Dolores Huerta, American labor leader and civil rights activist who advocated for farmworkers rights in California. Our students draw inspiration from figures like Cesar Chavez, whose legacy inspired a civil rights movement for Latin American immigrants in the United States.

Today, and every day, students of immigrant background celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month to remember our past, to discuss where we are, and to help take control of our future.

Learn more about Saul Flores and his programs at campuspeak.com/flores.

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Old Keys Don’t Open New Doors http://www.campuspeak.com/old-keys-dont-open-new-doors/ http://www.campuspeak.com/old-keys-dont-open-new-doors/#respond Tue, 19 Sep 2017 15:05:47 +0000 http://campuspeak.com/?p=1298 By: James Robilotta, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker One of the biggest threats to organizational success are individuals who were part of a system or team when it was working in the past. Reason being, these are the first people to say, “This is the way we have always done it.” AKA, the leadership phrase of death. Sometimes, […]

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By: James Robilotta, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker

One of the biggest threats to organizational success are individuals who were part of a system or team when it was working in the past. Reason being, these are the first people to say, “This is the way we have always done it.” AKA, the leadership phrase of death. Sometimes, the most experienced person in the room can have the most negative impact.

Older members gain a somewhat deserved sense of entitlement in our organizations. They have the most experience, have seen what’s worked and what hasn’t, and therefore have earned the right to be listened to. Being the most experienced person does not automatically make them a leader though. There is a big difference between being a leader and being a resource. Leadership is an action, not a title.

Leaders innovate, they are never stagnant, and sure as heck never say “That’s the way we have always done it.” If it ain’t broke, leaders still seek ways to improve it. A good leader does not change everything; a good leader challenges everything.

Here are a number questions to ask your executive board members, advisors, and/or co-workers as you seek to be more innovative in this upcoming academic year:

  1. What programs have we put on in the past few years that we are no longer excited about? Remember, just because it’s a tradition, doesn’t mean it’s good.
  2. What events do we do more out of a sense of obligation than out of “our organization gets a lot out of this”?
  3. How can we utilize our more experienced members to make sure they feel valued in our organization?
  4. This year, what will we be great at?
  5. Who are the key players that we need investment from to help make sure that happens? (Note: Everyone is not the answer.)
  6. This year, we will waste less time doing what? How?
  7. What is a new way that we are going to make the members of our organization feel like they have a role in its success?
  8. One idea for my organization I’ve always had but was always afraid what others would say about it is… (Hint: this is the year, bring it up, get buy-in, get it done)

I would love to hear your thoughts about this and/or answers to some of these questions so tweet at me, @JamesTRobo, and let’s start the conversation!

 

Learn more about James Robilotta and his student leadership keynotes at campuspeak.com/robilotta.

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Anyone That Truly Cares About Their Organization Has Thought of Quitting http://www.campuspeak.com/quitting/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 12:08:55 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=26020 By: David Stollman, CAMPUSPEAK President & Speaker Nobody talks about it, but anyone that truly cares about their organization has thought of quitting. It might be a fleeting thought, but it is there. Don’t feel guilty about it. It is a natural part of caring as much as you do. You’re reading this because you’re a […]

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By: David Stollman, CAMPUSPEAK President & Speaker

Nobody talks about it, but anyone that truly cares about their organization has thought of quitting. It might be a fleeting thought, but it is there. Don’t feel guilty about it. It is a natural part of caring as much as you do.

You’re reading this because you’re a leader or want to be one. You care deeply about your organization. You love what it is, almost as much as what you know it could be. You have a vision of how to get there, and you want to make a difference. Members want things to be better but are resistant to change. Change is scary, uncomfortable and risky. It takes strong leaders to shoulder the responsibility and to suffer the frustration and setbacks in order to guide a group through change.

“The pose doesn’t begin until you want to quit.” Huh? Sounded like some Zen, Yogi bullshit to me at first. But, it’s true. We only grow at the edge of our comfort zone. When we are pushed and think we’ve arrived at our limit… we grow. Our muscles, both physical and emotional, don’t grow when we are comfortable.

Leadership is filled with challenges and disappointments. For each success, there are thousands of pain points along the way. Take them with poise and even gratitude – they make you stronger. Expect that friends will let you down. Some will – but, don’t focus on the disappointment. Instead, pay special attention to those that stepped up; especially the ones you never expected would.

When it happens, when you hit that wall… know that you CAN get through it. It is a natural part of leadership. See burnout for what it is. It is just another step toward success.

Burnout. Maybe you’ve felt it before. Surely, you’ll feel it again at some point in your journey. Remember that burnout isn’t caused by how much work you do. It’s caused by how much work you see others not doing. One strategy is to focus on those that will be led. SW, SW, SW. One of the best things I learned about leadership. Some Will. Some Won’t. So What. Work with those that will and don’t focus on those that won’t. They’ll burn you out if you let them. Take energy from those that will work with you to get things done, and let them remind you why your membership matters so much.

Leadership isn’t supposed to be easy. It is supposed to be filled with lots of work, and effort, and stress. What’s great about fraternal organizations is that you have the opportunity to lead, to try, and to fail. And when you do, brothers and sisters who have sworn a sacred oath to you, are there to pick you up, dust you off, and help you start all over again.

Key Take-Aways:

  1. Wanting to quit is natural. It means you really love your organization.
  2. It is OK to get frustrated. Leaders grow at the edge of their comfort zone.
  3. Burnout is caused by seeing others not working. Focus instead on members that want to work.

Learn more about David Stollman at campuspeak.com/stollman.

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3 Things We Can Learn From Students’ Secret Fears http://www.campuspeak.com/secretfears/ Tue, 05 Sep 2017 12:24:29 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25941 What if you could jump into your students’ minds and see what is preventing them from being the person they aspire to be? For the past few years, I’ve collected thousands (and still collect) thousands of students’ fears as a way to connect and speak specifically to their internal struggles with the hope that it […]

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What if you could jump into your students’ minds and see what is preventing them from being the person they aspire to be?

For the past few years, I’ve collected thousands (and still collect) thousands of students’ fears as a way to connect and speak specifically to their internal struggles with the hope that it will help them move closer to success. Every fear is collected anonymously; typed, analyzed, and then categorized through ATLAS software. Here are three things we can learn from students’ secret fears:

They need to know they’re not alone.
I can’t say it enough. After reading note cards and private messages, too many students think they are alone, not realizing that their peers are experiencing the same thoughts. I still get goosebumps at the silence of a room, filled with hundreds of students, when their fears are read out loud. I’m convinced that part of the silence is due to the students’ realization for the first time that they’re not the only ones dealing with a problem. We need to continually stress that whatever they are experiencing, ten times out of ten, someone else is as well.

Their past is heavily influencing their present.
We often attempt to pile leadership techniques on a shaky 18-year old foundation of self-doubt, confidence issues, and pressure from family and friends. Allowing students to talk about life experiences that shaped them is the first step to rebuilding. Creating safe spaces, small discussion groups, and ways to speak anonymously are all ways in which students can share with their peers their experiences in an open and honest environment. Students will be able to address and own their past; at their own pace. Their vulnerability will help build their future.

They really fear failure.
The #1 word that the ATLAS software pulled from the written responses I have received is the word failure. When the responses are categorized, the top fear category is the fear of failing or not being successful at a whopping 43%. Hands down – our students fear failure. Students aren’t stepping up because they are afraid of what might happen if they fail – they don’t understand the added value when life doesn’t go as planned. We have to highlight and reward students when they take risks, and they don’t end up successful, so they are more comfortable in failing and learning important lessons for growth.

Knowing these three points helps us catch a glimpse into student fears and allows us to help support them. I share with students that fearlessness doesn’t mean skydiving and being reckless – fearlessness is taking that obstacle in between you and your aspirations and taking the next step to overcome it.

Learn more about Darryl Bellamy at campuspeak.com/bellamy.

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The Best Advice About College I Ever Received http://www.campuspeak.com/bestadvice/ Wed, 23 Aug 2017 18:07:16 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25874 By: Tom Healy, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker The best advice I was ever given about college came just a few days before my freshman year at Ohio University, when someone bluntly said to me “do not let your classes get in the way of your real education.”  The message was clear: for you to thrive personally and professionally, […]

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By: Tom Healy, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker

The best advice I was ever given about college came just a few days before my freshman year at Ohio University, when someone bluntly said to me “do not let your classes get in the way of your real education.”  The message was clear: for you to thrive personally and professionally, it isn’t about what you learn in a textbook or memorize for an exam, it is about your ability to get involved in student organizations, develop critical life skills and ultimately tap into your extraordinary potential as a leader.

I have the unbelievable opportunity of working with student leaders around the country – here is some of my best advice for those who want to take ownership of their college experience and thrive as leaders:

Learn more about Tom Healy and his programs at campuspeak.com/healy.

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Few Talk, Many Affected: Changing the Culture About Men’s Mental Health http://www.campuspeak.com/fewtalk/ Wed, 23 Aug 2017 16:38:59 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25863 Dr. Kevin Snyder has presented over 1,150 programs in all 50 states and has been with CAMPUSPEAK for over a decade. He’s also a former Dean of Students, an author with a best-selling book, and a professional speaker with a wealth of unique expertise both in Student Affairs and in corporate America. We sat down […]

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Dr. Kevin Snyder has presented over 1,150 programs in all 50 states and has been with CAMPUSPEAK for over a decade. He’s also a former Dean of Students, an author with a best-selling book, and a professional speaker with a wealth of unique expertise both in Student Affairs and in corporate America.

We sat down with Kevin to ask a few questions about his perspective on what makes a great leader, and to learn more about his new 2017 presentation Few Talk, Many Affected: Changing the Culture About Men’s Mental Health – a program designed to change the culture about men’s mental health. Kevin’s nuggets of wisdom below are ideal to share with your student groups and organizational leaders.

Question: Reading your bio, you have an interesting background. How did you get started in Student Affairs?

Kevin:  As a new student in college, I struggled. I didn’t realize it at the time, but I was depressed, anxious, and miserable. I tried dropping out on numerous occasions, but someone always stepped in to convince me to not to – usually, my RA or the Dean of Students because he had to sign my withdrawal paperwork. During my second year, I decided to give college one final shot at getting outside my comfort zone and more involved on campus. Becoming more engaged changed everything. I went from near drop out to Homecoming King and Greek Man of the Year. Although I graduated with a degree in Marine Biology, I knew I wanted to work on a college campus so I could help and support other students like people did for me. That’s why I’ve been a Director of Student Activities, Orientation Coordinator, Academic Advisor, and most recently a Dean of Students.

Question: Why did you develop your new program, Few Talk, Many Affected: Changing the Culture About Men’s Mental Health?

Kevin: For a couple of reasons.  First, #1, because I was surprised no one was talking about mental health for men specifically. If we don’t talk about issues affecting men, the statistics will only get worse. Yet the social stigmas are targeted against men. So as a speaker, I view my role as a facilitator for to have this extremely important conversation but in a positive, empowering tone. Secondly, #2, I wanted those in my audience not to feel alone like I did when I was in college. Once I realized others around me were quietly battling similar issues, it helped me realize I wasn’t alone. I’m alive today because of the support I received from others. Third, #3, nothing will change in life unless we do. We all have a role and purpose in life, and it’s up to us to identify what that is. For me, at least right now, my purpose is to be a catalyst that inspires positive change. This new program for men accomplishes that.

Question: Why do you think men will benefit from your presentation?

Kevin: Because this program might be the first time they have a conversation about it. This might be the first time they feel safe or comfortable to address their authentic self. Listen, 73% of the average person’s thoughts on a daily basis are negative. When I first read this statistic, it shocked me. Once I became more aware of my own internal thoughts – my mindset – and how I could reprogram my mind to deal with those issues and focus on the positive, my entire life changed. I still have moments, like anyone, but I know where to place focus. The benefit from this presentation will be sharing with men how to become more aware, so they know how to help themselves and others.

Question: In your program for men, what are some of the issues you address?

Kevin: I designed the presentation to be uplifting, interactive … even entertaining. I’m not the type of speaker who can present without laughter and audience engagement. This is especially important with the topics I’m covering in this presentation including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, sexual and substance abuse, eating disorders, and suicide. I’ll address the signs and symptoms of these issues, but more importantly, how others can seek help and treatment. More people suffer from these issues than heart disease and cancer combined.

Question: Generally speaking, do you have a favorite type of audience when you speak?

Kevin: Oh gosh. Well, as I said before, each audience is unique, but my speaking roots are with college students. So if you twisted my arm for an answer, it’s definitely college student audiences. I love speaking at fraternity and sorority events like Greek Weeks, leadership activities, and new member events. I also love presenting campus-based keynotes with new students during orientation or for student leadership conferences. I designed three different keynotes in order to have a powerful program for each unique collegiate audience: (1) Leadership DNA, (2) Proud and Purposeful: The Fraternal Experience and (3) UNSTOPPABLE.

Question: Lastly, if there’s one thing you’d want someone reading this to know about how to achieve their goals and taking their leadership to the next level, what would that be?

Kevin: Just one thing? Well, effective leadership is never about doing just one thing, so that’s difficult to answer. Instead, it’s about doing many things over and over … and doing them well. However, I have found two patterns with people who seem to struggle with achieving goals. Number 1, they either aren’t as clear as they think in regards to what that goal actually is; or number 2, they don’t take consistent action to develop a strategy and work towards that goal. I know that’s more than one thing, but clarity and strategy are crucial to becoming an effective leader as well as leading a team. No one wants to follow someone else who doesn’t know where they are going or how they’re going to get there.

Question: Thanks so much for talking with us.

Kevin: Honored. Thank you!

 

To watch Kevin’s NEW DEMO VIDEO and learn about his CAMPUSPEAK programs for your students, view his website at http://campuspeak.com/speaker/snyder. Connect with him on Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook or Twitter @KevinCSnyder. Download Kevin’s new leadership app (@KevinCSnyder) and receive a daily motivational quote!

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Back to School: How to Prepare as an LGBTQ+ Student http://www.campuspeak.com/lgbtqschool/ Tue, 22 Aug 2017 16:14:35 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25839 By: Jeremy Wallace, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker It’s back to school time again, and for many students, time to head to campus! Attending a college or university is exciting, but can also be overwhelming, and the apprehension and nervousness may be even greater for those students who identify as transgender, gender queer or gender non-conforming. The best […]

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By: Jeremy Wallace, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker

It’s back to school time again, and for many students, time to head to campus! Attending a college or university is exciting, but can also be overwhelming, and the apprehension and nervousness may be even greater for those students who identify as transgender, gender queer or gender non-conforming. The best way to alleviate some of the concerns and fears is to be prepared, or as prepared as one can be.

What does that look like? Well, the number one thing to do is ask. Ask as many questions as you can think of and continue to ask different people or departments until you get an answer. Ask before you get to campus, so you will have a heads up and the opportunity to voice your concerns privately. For example, housing is a large concern for students, and transgender students need to know what their living arrangments will be, before arriving on campus. Make sure to ask the college or university for specifics. Are dorms coed? What is the campus policy as it relates to gender specific housing and how do they support transgender students? What policies or procedures are in place if a transgender student needs assistance or feels threatened? Campus housing, especially the dorms/apartments on campus are there to provide a safe living space for all students, and it’s the school’s duty to make sure that it truly applies to ALL students.

Secondly, take time to find the campus LGBTQ+ center or pride group if they have one, and stop in. These groups are equipped and prepared to help LGBTQ+ students’ transition to campus life and will not only be a great resource but also can be the foundation for a wonderful support system. If your college or university doesn’t have a specific campus pride organization, check with the local town the school is located in to see what resources are available to the LGBTQ+ community. Again, they can be a wealth of knowledge for supporting your academic life, and beyond.

Also, for those students who use a name that is different from their legal birth name, be prepared to see that “old” name on official school documents and records. And until you have a chance to talk directly with any faculty, also be prepared for that awkward moment of being called by the ‘wrong” name. The school isn’t trying to hurt you; it’s just a matter of having to use your legal name for record keeping, and they haven’t met you yet. Personally, I hate that policy, but I haven’t figured out a work-around. Now, if you encounter faculty or staff that continues to use your birth name and misgender you, that’s a whole different story, and again where the campus pride group can help you to address that. The reason I bring up the issue of legal names is that for many, seeing and hearing your birth name, and with the expectation that you will acknowledge and respond to that name, is a trigger and can cause mental and emotional distress. Until I legally changed my name, being called by my birth (female) name was a source of anxiety and embarrassment, and reinforced my body/gender dysphoria. If it helps, practice what you might say or do when those moments occur, and hopefully, you will be pleasantly surprised that the real life experience goes much smoother than expected.

For the students who have legally changed their name and documents, be prepared and bring notarized copies of your name/gender marker change. You may never need them, but having immediate access to the documents can save time and future errors. Just tuck them away in a safe place, and relax knowing you’re covered.

Like I said before, college is exciting, and hopefully, your experience with higher education will be a time in your life that you look back with fondness. The best way to increase those chances is to do some homework before you begin. Find out as much as you can before classes start, but continue to ask questions throughout your academic career, ask for help and seek out the allies. College is far more than just taking classes; it’s the entire experience of being on your own and learning more about yourself, and the more information you have beforehand, the better your chances are of success during the school year.

Learn more about Jeremy Wallace and his diversity and inclusion keynotes at campuspeak.com/wallace.

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My Biggest Takeaways as a Non-traditional College Student http://www.campuspeak.com/dosanddonts/ Tue, 22 Aug 2017 14:49:28 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25833 By: Ethan Fisher, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker It seems like college was only a short time ago. College was a part of my life for over a decade – and no – I’m not a doctor. In 1998, I started my freshman year, and I didn’t graduate with my first bachelor’s degree until 2010. I received my […]

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By: Ethan Fisher, CAMPUSPEAK Speaker

It seems like college was only a short time ago. College was a part of my life for over a decade – and no – I’m not a doctor. In 1998, I started my freshman year, and I didn’t graduate with my first bachelor’s degree until 2010. I received my second bachelor’s degree in 2011 and my master’s degree in 2014. I think it is safe to say that I know the college world better than most.

The majority of my time on campus was filled with nights and weeks of constant binge drinking and partying like many students. Every morning, I woke up with a headache and a dry mouth. My body and brain hurt so much that I wouldn’t get out of bed; pulling the blankets back over me and sleeping the day away. I would attend classes occasionally, neglecting my responsibilities as a student and student-athlete.

Midterms and finals would come and go as laid in my bed waiting for the evening to come so I could start drinking again. The end of the semester showed this with transcripts of grades that consisted of D’s, F’s, Incomplete or Withdrawal.

Already knowing I was failing out of school, my bags were packed and ready to move back home and attend the local community college. This reoccurring lifestyle lasted the next half decade, thinking college was just a game. In total, I failed out of five schools and re-enrolling at the same community college five different semesters.

In 2003 that all changed after getting invited to a local house party. It was a typical night of drinking with friends until I found myself waking up in a hospital bed after drinking wine and blacking out. Eventually, a nurse came in and told me that I drove drunk and killed somebody – let that sink in.

Imagine what it’s like to live the rest of your life knowing you killed an innocent man from drinking and driving. Imagine the person’s family – crying and grieving for the rest of their lives. They lost their family member because of a college student who chose to drink and drive.

It can happen to you!

I had a choice to make. I could give up at life, or I could decide to change. I chose to change.

Fast-forward nearly five years later. School became a priority. I won multiple academic awards and honors. I shifted my priorities when I was released from prison. I knew it was important to get my college education, considering my situation in the legal system. I wanted to graduate from college and earn my degree and prove to everyone that I changed.

College would give me an opportunity to rebuild my life as a convicted felon. It would give me some hope in finding a somewhat normal life and a better job. By 2014, I graduated with two bachelor’s degrees, three minors, one master’s degree and a GPA of 3.71, while working 40 hours per week. From my experience, here are four of my biggest takeaways from my non-traditional time in college:

Manage Your Time – During my last stint in college, I was taking anywhere between 12 – 24 credits a trimester, working 30-40 hours per week and playing college basketball; which is a full-time job. I did this by managing my time. I would “chunk” hours throughout the day based on necessity. I would wake up at 4 AM, work until basketball practice at 6:00 AM. At 9 AM, I would go to class or do homework until break, go home and work a few hours. I would go back to homework or class, work a few hours and back to homework until midnight. I managed my time and made sure I didn’t get burned out on one subject or work by separating tasks in blocks of 2-3 hours.

Build a Relationship with Your Professors – Ask questions and be engaged in classes with your professor. Ask for help and build relationships with your teachers that can not only improve your grades but will also build lasting relationships outside of your college years. Professors want to help their students, and many will continue to do so after you graduate. To this day, I still visit my business professor for his advice about entrepreneurship wisdom and ideas.

Don’t Procrastinate – I managed my time to accomplish more than most. I always made sure I got to projects, papers, or goals as soon as I could. I would start preparing for the midterms after the first week. I would slowly review my notes or do research for my business papers within the first day or two. I would never “cram” for a test or final because I was already prepared. Don’t live your college life stressed out because you’re doing everything last-minute.

Don’t Let Alcohol, Drugs, and Parties Ruin Your Life – It is easy for me to say that alcohol, drugs, and parties in college ruined my life. It also destroyed the life of another person and destroyed their family. I used to think all the stories I heard about accidents and doing dumb things while drunk in college were just scare-tactics by adults. I stumbled around five college campuses thinking that it would NEVER happen to me – and it did!

I wish I had taken school seriously when I first started as a freshman and followed my dreams before I allowed alcohol and drugs to ruin my life. I regret giving into the social pressures of my campus environment, and I wish I had never allowed myself to become a follower of others and chose to be the leader that I am today.

Learn more about Ethan Fisher at campuspeak.com/fisher.

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CAMPUSPEAK’s Response to Recent Events in Charlottesville, VA http://www.campuspeak.com/charlottesville/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 13:10:40 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25776 We Will Touch People’s Lives – It’s the only reason we are in business—to deliver important ideas which empower students to make a difference in their communities and in their own lives. Everything we do will honor, respect and promote human dignity and potential. This is the first of our five CAMPUSPEAK Core Values. It has not […]

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We Will Touch People’s Lives – It’s the only reason we are in business—to deliver important ideas which empower students to make a difference in their communities and in their own lives. Everything we do will honor, respect and promote human dignity and potential.

This is the first of our five CAMPUSPEAK Core Values. It has not changed. It will not change. We believe that it all begins by acknowledging that all people are equal and deserve our recognition and respect. Anything short of that is simply unacceptable.

We can’t limit the fear-mongers right to freely speak their hate. But, the RIGHT to spread their hate must be overpowered by our RESPONSIBILITY to spread love. It is for us to recommit ourselves to the unassailable dignity all human kind. For the simple, unqualified rejection of hatred in any form – whether by race, religion, creed, sexual orientation, gender identification, physical or mental ability, or any other element or difference that makes humanity so beautiful.

We must use what has happened in Charlottesville, VA  as a reminder to recommit ourselves to support all those who are oppressed, marginalized, forgotten, abused, and mistreated. We must ensure that anyone whose basic human dignity and worth is questioned feels our support. We will NOT allow hate to spread in a vacuum of OUR silence.

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” – Edmund Burke

DO SOMETHING. Speak out – act out. Support organizations that fight hate and spread love. Challenge others to see the value of diversity and the responsibility of inclusion. Don’t be silent. We won’t.

David Stollman
CAMPUSPEAK President

 

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Four Tips For College Students For the Back to School Season http://www.campuspeak.com/backtoschool/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 13:43:52 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25726 It’s that dreaded back to school season. We’re almost there—with the exception of you lovable overachievers going year round or on trimesters—the countdown to the fall semester officially has begun. Many students are probably wondering: How am I going to start off strong? How am I going to juggle classes along with my new relationship and […]

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It’s that dreaded back to school season. We’re almost there—with the exception of you lovable overachievers going year round or on trimesters—the countdown to the fall semester officially has begun. Many students are probably wondering: How am I going to start off strong? How am I going to juggle classes along with my new relationship and a full-time job? How will I find an internship or the job that I love?

Some students are probably feeling intense pressure to succeed and to be some sort of “perfect” (what does that mean anyway?) from professors, parents, and those carefully placed TV PSAs. It’s enough pressure to make a person break into two. To have a successful transition back to school and to stay in one piece, you need to develop resources to live mentally healthy and to repair those metaphorical cracks in the brain when everything around you seems like it’s falling apart and you feel like you might crumble. Here are four tips for back to school:

  1. Know how and where to find your campus resources: One of the biggest keys to success while in college is to know where and how to access resources of help. That could involve hiring a tutor, knowing where the counseling office is located, how to find events on campus, or which campus job is the cushiest.
  2. Developing healthy habits: While emerging from a six-week period of depression and suicidal thinking while I was in college, I realized I needed to develop new tools to dig myself out of the hole I fell into and give myself a fighting chance to keep myself out of that hole forever. I had to develop healthy habits. Some of these habits included getting on a regular sleep schedule, cultivating positive friendships, healthy eating and exercise, creative activities, and finding a  counselor I could talk to.
  3. Reframing failure: By changing the word “failure” to a “lesson learned on the way to success,” your possibilities become nearly limitless, and the pain of failure is temporary.
  4. Creating a support system for yourself: the foundation of any personal success, great or small, is reaching out for temporary support and then long-term sustainable support. Temporary support can be: asking for directions at a gas station, government assistance, a crisis line, a student loan. Sustainable support can involve: reaching out to friends, family, a therapist, and/or mentors. Reaching out for support can feel like a little win, but over a period of time, the support you receive can result in big gains.

For more college mental health resources, you can reach out to Active Minds, and The i’Mpossible Project.

Learn more about Josh Rivedal at campuspeak.com/rivedal.

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You Are Enough http://www.campuspeak.com/youareenough/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 13:30:33 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25724 As the school year begins, we place a lot of high expectations on ourselves. As great as it is to go into the year with goals, we have to be careful that those goals don’t turn into a competition with our peers. If we’re not careful, we’ll end up sizing ourselves up next to our […]

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As the school year begins, we place a lot of high expectations on ourselves. As great as it is to go into the year with goals, we have to be careful that those goals don’t turn into a competition with our peers. If we’re not careful, we’ll end up sizing ourselves up next to our classmates, our roommates—even our friends (without even realizing it!). All of sudden, we get those nagging feelings of resentment, jealousy, and uncertainty about ourselves. That little voice within tells us that we are inferior, insufficient—that not only will we not reach those goals, but we will also fail entirely.

Well, that took a dark turn.

Thankfully, we can turn it around. Rather than compare ourselves to others, we can find opportunities to learn from one another and in the process, learn to love ourselves. If you don’t foster a love for yourself and what you stand for, all of the knowledge, self-care, and resources are meaningless. I cannot make you care about yourself: only you can do that. Of course, I can tell you that you are valuable, worthwhile, and loved but only you can believe that.

I know you might have doubts about yourself; perhaps you think you aren’t “enough,” but will you do something for me? Will you read the following sentence and truly believe it?

I am enough.

You are enough. I am enough. Just as we are. Do you believe this? Life is going to be a long journey if you cannot start accepting yourself for the imperfectly perfect person that you are. We all have made mistakes, and we will continue to do so (myself included!). That is the essence of being human. But it is also the essence of humanness that includes goodness, compassion, and kindness. I believe that you already possess all that inherent goodness within you. You just have to own that and know that you are entirely wonderful.

As you read this, ask yourself what FIVE qualities make you AMAZING? Embrace it!

Many of my clients speak words of shame to themselves. I often hear the following come out of their mouth on a weekly basis:

  • I’m not smart enough.
  • I’m not talkative enough.
  • I’m not pretty/handsome enough.
  • I’m not funny enough.
  • I’m not cool enough.
  • I’m not thin/strong enough.

The list could go on and on. But let’s stop this list. Rather than compare ourselves to others, let’s remember that we are enough as we are. It’s not about comparison. There can be room for everyone to succeed. I know that I have days when I feel insufficient, and days when I have doubts, but I have to remind myself: I am enough. And if someone thinks that I am not enough? Then that is their loss and someone else’s gain. I trust that even when someone says “no” to me or denies me an opportunity, something better is meant to come along. I believe this for your life as well.

Remember, you are skilled enough, you are smart enough, you are dedicated enough to accomplish what you are seeking to do. If you compare yourself to others, we all will fall short in one way or another. So instead, hold yourself to your own highest standard and seek to meet that potential. That’s all that you owe to yourself.

Learn more about the Sunny Girl, Lauren Cook and her programs at campuspeak.com/cook.

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Chase an Authentic Life http://www.campuspeak.com/chase/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 13:20:46 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25722 As an ethics professor and professional speaker on living an authentic life, my advice to students always begins with this remarkable fable: Imagine a racing greyhound named Cash. One warm summer evening, Cash sits outside on the front porch and discusses the future with his owner. The duo is world-famous and financially stable from the […]

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As an ethics professor and professional speaker on living an authentic life, my advice to students always begins with this remarkable fable:

Imagine a racing greyhound named Cash. One warm summer evening, Cash sits outside on the front porch and discusses the future with his owner. The duo is world-famous and financially stable from the payouts of many big races. Between memories, Cash drops a bombshell and says, “I have made a decision. I have decided that I cannot race anymore. My career is finished!”

His startled owner queries, “I must not have heard you correctly Cash, are you too old to race?” “No,” Cash replies, “I still have some race left in me.” “Well, do I mistreat you?” asks the owner. “No, no, you’ve always treated me wonderfully,” answers Cash. “Then why?” wonders the owner – still in shock – “Why would you give up on our chance to be rich and famous…”

Cash cuts her off in mid sentence and makes a simple, yet profound statement: “After running and running and running all of these years, I finally realized that the rabbits I’ve been chasing all my life are fake and I don’t want to race anymore.”

We all chase fake rabbits in one form or another. We desire popularity and respect from our peers and we strive to possess the same amenities as our neighbors. We tell white lies to avoid telling hard truths and fake it to appear more intelligent, more attractive and more accomplished than we really are. Worst of all, we readily blame others and avoid taking responsibility for our mistakes in order to save face.

We are all human and conditioned from childhood to chase worldly success in the form of excessive wealth, popularity, and recognition. Unfortunately, these “successes” rarely create the true and sustainable happiness we have always desired and we sometimes wonder where we steered off course. The great thing about life, however, is that the road to lasting, authentic success contains many on-ramps. Although we have chased fake rabbits in the past, we can move towards authentic success in a split second. The only thing missing is the motivation.

At this point, you are likely asking, “Well, chasing authentic success sounds like a good idea, but what exactly are the real rabbits I should focus on?” To me, real rabbits are the things that really matter in life such as:

(1) a strong moral character,

(2) solid personal relationships and

(3) a sense of contentment as you wake up each morning.

Once we choose to chase after these things, we strive to tell the truth, desire to make better decisions and learn to take personal responsibility for our mistakes. More importantly, we experience the lasting benefits that come with authentic success. Bring me in to speak and help you and your organization walk down this path to authentic success!

More on Corey Ciocchetti: an Associate Professor of Business Ethics and Legal Studies at the University of Denver, Corey Ciocchetti is one of the University’s most popular and highest-rated professors. Corey joined DU after graduating with a law degree from Duke University School of Law, a Masters degree in Religious Studies and two Bachelors degrees in Finance and Economics—summa cum laude—from the University of Denver.

Corey is a talented speaker and teacher and has won multiple teaching and speaking awards including the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award by the University of Denver Alumni Association and CAMPUSPEAK’s Joel Goldman Award. He currently teaches classes on business law and ethics in a department ranked by the Wall Street Journal and Business Week in the top ten nationwide for producing students with high ethical standards.

Corey also speaks to tens of thousands of individuals each year about “authentic success” and living an ethical life and is the author of the book Real Rabbits: Chasing An Authentic Life. He has spoken to diverse audiences, including the University of Hawaii Pediatrics Residency Program, undergraduates at MIT, the Federal Reserve Bank, the National Fire Leadership Academy, the Colorado State Patrol and the third graders of Mapleton School District in Adams County, Colorado (that one was tough). He has spoken in over 225 cities and 42 states over the past ten years. A Colorado native, Corey resides in Westminster, Colorado with his wife, Jillian.

 

Learn more about Corey at campuspeak.com/corey.

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SMARTER Goals: Begin with the Change in Mind http://www.campuspeak.com/smartergoals/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 19:13:21 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25495 This is an excerpt from Camille Nelson’s full article, SMARTER Goals: Begin with the Change in Mind Why are goals important? It is a complex question. It is a known rule that it takes an average of 10,000 hours to become an expert at a craft. So to become truly phenomenal at something, you need […]

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Camille Nelson

This is an excerpt from Camille Nelson’s full article, SMARTER Goals: Begin with the Change in Mind

Why are goals important? It is a complex question.

It is a known rule that it takes an average of 10,000 hours to become an expert at a craft. So to become truly phenomenal at something, you need to focus consistently and routinely for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, 44 weeks a year, for 5.5 years. That is both incredibly daunting and reasonable as a time frame. Yet the question again is not how long it will take to get there, but what the best path for you to take is. This is where optimal goals are truly needed.

The goal of any business, organization, or individual endeavor is to be prosperous. However, for any initiative to be successful, there have to be goals that everyone can understand and relate to. For example, a person in sales is going to contribute to the success of the company in a vastly different way than the head of IT or finance. In order to set targets inside goals, there has to be a sense of equality for all participants.

Why is this so hard to achieve in business, campus organizations and in life? Well, the honest answer is that at both the individual level and in organizations, society has an obsession with goal setting. In the current culture, neither an organization nor an individual can be considered successful unless goals are set and then met. The typical incentive used by leaders to achieve these goals is the continual focus on harder and harder work, increased productivity, and overall improvement. The way to measure that success is to measure goal fulfillment.

How often have you seen this goal-setting template?

  • Write down clear and concise goals
  • Identify how goal success will be measured
  • Set goal deadlines and state the specific outcomes or results to aim for
  • Assign rewards for success and punishment for failure

This template is just one of many that show the basic way many people set goals. The backing for always setting goals reportedly comes from a variety of sources, including academic research. An example of this academic research that is widely cited is the 1953 Yale study. In this study, researchers reportedly surveyed the graduating seniors from the class of 1953 at Yale University to see who had written goals for their future. The results indicated that 97% had not created long-term goals while only 3% had. Then after two decades of waiting, researchers were said to have gone back to the surviving members of the class and discovered that those who had written life goals had accumulated more wealth than all their classmates put together. However, the only problem with this powerful finding is that there was no such study. Researchers at Yale and members of the class of 1953 all swear there was no such study.

This case of false research to help support the popularity of goal setting is actually compelling evidence of the opposite. It shows that regardless of good intentions and effort, many individuals and groups consistently fall short of achieving their goals. Furthermore, the fault is often put solely on the goal setter. Yet that is clearly not the whole story. What this really shows is that the goal-setting method is much more to blame than the person or group setting them.

Goals Don’t Matter as Much as What You Do Each Day

Many people think that if you don’t have a set of established goals, then you are unfocused or altogether lost. However, having studied and experienced a range of goal models and methodologies for some time, I can honestly say that it is not just having goals that matter, but rather what you do every day.

What really matters is that you’re constantly working throughout the day to progress as far towards your goal as you possibly can. When changes come–and they will come–by focusing on what to do that day or the next, you can stay on track and make small revisions to your plan to find continued success.

The goal is the end result, but the end result is not the only focal point. When you focus intently on your day-to-day activity, then the end goal eventually becomes a reality. When you focus on each moment instead of simply achieving your goal, you can avoid a lot of stress that would diminish your mental and emotional capacity to succeed.

Spread Out Your Needed 10,000 Hours of Practice

I mentioned before that there is scientific evidence to back up the claim that it takes roughly 10,000 hours of practice to make a permanent habit, which is closely related to many goals.

The research also suggests spreading out that work over a period of months in order to avoid burn out. This is also important when considering adaptability since the need to remain flexible is easier when tasks are not close together and can be easily rearranged. Again, some things can be done faster or may take longer, but this is the average. Depending on the goal you have in mind, other variables may also be added.

However, if you remember to consider these goals as long-term, then you won’t have to worry about how long it will take.

Goals Aren’t about Perfection

To continue the previous tip about timing, remember that goals shouldn’t be tied to the unrealistic idea of perfection. You can screw up from time to time and it won’t affect the process or completely sideline you the way many people feel it will.

I can vouch for this point like nobody’s business. I was in no way perfect when working towards many of my goals over the course of my life. The most important point to keep in mind is that you haven’t failed until you quit trying. This is such an important point to remember because we tend to beat ourselves up, especially when we’re first heading towards smaller, more amateur goals. Don’t beat yourself up. You don’t have to be perfect and you won’t ever be. Don’t waste valuable time or resources on this.

Be Genuine

Make sure your goals are truly based on what you want. Don’t follow inauthentic reasons like what others will think of you, panic over failure, or other limiting beliefs. This negative self-talk strongly influences what we do as humans and cannot be given a chance to thrive within your goals.

Also, by not basing your goals on fear and being genuine, you can adapt to change much better. Adopting a regular practice of self-awareness around the root of your goals can help you identify these fears and bring them to the surface, helping to separate yourself from them.

This can take time, but it is necessary in order for you to be confident that your goals are made with the best intentions.

Make Sure You Count All Victories, Big and Small

At the beginning of establishing a new goal, it can be daunting thinking about how far you have to go. That is why counting all victories, big and small, can help keep you motivated, allowing you to use these as a foundation to make any needed change. Taking a lot of action in the beginning of your plans will build up a strong momentum to move you towards your goal.

The SMARTer Model

S is for Short
Make goals SHORT and concise. The shorter, the better.

M is for Memorable
A goal is measurable if you can actually remember it. What did we just talk about? Shorter is better. Short goals make them more attainable.

A is for Adaptable
Forbes came out with an article with the most important characteristic we can develop today: adaptability. We have to learn to adapt to changes. Today, adaptability is more important than ever due to advancements in technology. There are no changing aspects. In the .com era, things change every day and quickly become obsolete, so adaptability is crucial.

R is for Review
Review your goals and review them often.

T is for Tentative Timeline
Make a timeline for the steps leading up to the goal, but remember it could change, so focus on both short-term and long-term goals.

Read Camille’s entire article about SMARTER Goals.

Learn more about speaker Camille Nelson: campuspeak.com/nelson.

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Getting Comfortable Being Uncomfortable http://www.campuspeak.com/gettingcomfortable/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 17:36:01 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25484 A lot of people get down on college students these days. “They complain too much!” “They don’t want to work!” “They have unrealistic expectations!” “They don’t want to work their way up!” “They can’t handle the pressure!” They are not “resilient,” they say. Even a simple Google search of “college students and resilience” will produce […]

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Kevin Smith

A lot of people get down on college students these days.

“They complain too much!” “They don’t want to work!” “They have unrealistic expectations!” “They don’t want to work their way up!” “They can’t handle the pressure!”

They are not “resilient,” they say. Even a simple Google search of “college students and resilience” will produce tons of articles on students’ declining mental health, grade inflation, and lack of coping, etc.

I do agree that this generation has more pressure to succeed than any other, and along with that pressure comes even more challenges. Until just ten years ago, for example, if you were picked on in school, it at least ended when you got home. Now, with social media, it never ends. Combine this social pressure with increased tuition costs, more competition for fewer jobs, rising costs of living, how could anyone expect a developing adult to thrive in life, let alone college?

Yet, as someone who has worked closely with college students for over a decade, I believe college students are more resilient than they think, and I’m out there to prove it. I’ve seen so many students accomplish extraordinary things which long-time professionals say they would’ve never dreamed of doing in college. From starting their own businesses, organizing and executing international trips with other students, to even raising $90,000 to bring a student from Haiti to college in the U.S., no one can convince me that today’s college students don’t have grit.

The only thing we do have to do is unlock their potential and then be willing to show them the way.

Here are just a few of the many tips I share with college students all over the U.S., and, when applied, the results are nothing short of amazing.

Become Comfortable Being Uncomfortable. Let’s face it; we make our daily lives as comfortable as possible. From our morning Starbucks routine, Uber Eats, to ergonomic chairs, we freak out if the room is one degree too hot or too cold or if one thing doesn’t go as planned. Life is naturally uncertain and habits that we rely upon for happiness only force us into a fixed mindset, which limits our growth.

Remember, stories of inspiration don’t come from those who never overcame a challenge. Make a list of seven things that make you uncomfortable and do one a day for every day of the week, then rinse and repeat until you find yourself doing them with ease. These things can be anything from asking for critical feedback, listening with your full attention, or simply trying a new food from a restaurant full of people who don’t speak your language. There’s no such thing as a flower that doesn’t grow through dirt, so get your soil ready.

Learn How to Learn: I’ve met brew masters who were art teachers, coffee shop owners and Walt Disney Imagineers who were accountants, and restaurant owners who were chemists, all among countless other successful people who broke free of their restraints.  They all have one thing in common – they learned how to learn.

Too often, we are so afraid to fail that we seldom take on new challenges. Instead, we need to develop a high-tolerance for non-repetitive failure and a growth mindset. This means we need to set a course to try, fail, learn, and grow.

Think of it like dating, the ultimate life-learning experience, where no one shows you how to do it right, so the only way you get better is by failing over and over. It’s not enough for us to become comfortable being uncomfortable, we have to learn from it.  Better yet, we must take the next step and describe what we learned from it. There’s power in describing things, and when you can describe what makes you successful, you’ll enable others to believe in you.

Show Your Grit: You’re not resilient if you don’t show it. Often students get asked questions about overcoming failure, and their responses are mostly dull. Too often I hear stuff like “I got a C on a paper once, so I worked real hard and got an A the next time.” This is not resilience; this is a normal effort. These types of answers are also why more experienced professionals think college students are soft.

We’ve all overcome struggles in our lives. It’s time to own them and sew them together as part of our narrative. Take time to reflect on how overcoming those hardships make you a stronger leader, performer, or better member of a team.

There’s treasure inside of you, but it isn’t worth anything to anyone else if you don’t show it off once in a while.

Kevin Smith is a writer, speaker, coach, entrepreneur, and a long-time professional in higher education. Kevin has spoken on leadership topics and personal success to over 100,000 college students and industry professionals on four continents.

Learn more about speaker Kevin Smith: campuspeak.com/smith.

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Let’s Talk About Sex http://www.campuspeak.com/letstalk/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 16:54:51 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25474 I still remember the day my mom decided to give me “the talk.” During the prime of my 6th grade years, my school had decided to tell us all about the bird and the bees already and unbeknownst to me when my mom asked me to walk the dog; she was aware of their education […]

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Tim Mousseau

I still remember the day my mom decided to give me “the talk.” During the prime of my 6th grade years, my school had decided to tell us all about the bird and the bees already and unbeknownst to me when my mom asked me to walk the dog; she was aware of their education as well. I thought nothing of our walk, until halfway around the block, she paused gravely and began. “Now Tim, I know your school has already done this with you, they sent home information saying they would do it, but I need to make sure they talked about everything…”

And from there, I received what might have been one of the most awkward, yet illuminating talks of my life. My mom is quite the open person, and she led a very elaborate discussion on sex; much better than what happened at school. Even with how awkward it was, I am extremely fortunate to have been raised in a family where we talked about such things openly. As uncomfortable as it was, I am gracious I had such a conversation. My mother wanted to make sure that I knew not only how to have safe sex, but how to prepare emotionally, how to select partners and to drive home the ideas of sex as a partnership instead of a transaction. 6th grade me would never tell you this, but I was very fortunate that day.

The truth of the matter is that in the United States, one of the biggest issues we face is the fact that we are failing to properly talk with our students about sex in all walks of life. The flaws of which are beginning to show heavily. Having spoken about my assault and this general topic to countless college students, part of what I have seen is this, where we have problems with sexual assault, yes, we also have problems talking about sex in general. It is time we start better educating on healthy sexual relations as a piece of the puzzle.

(Side note: Before we move further into the topic, I just want to clarify that I am a survivor of a very violent sexual assault involving the use of substances for predatory, planned assault including a follow-up of stalking and blackmail. I do not think that if we only educate on healthy sex that we would be able to prevent all forms of predatory assault. I understand violent rape, and predatory assault happen. However, we do have issues with gray consent, healthy sexual partnerships, and a general uncomfortableness talking about sex that can be remedied through proper education.)

Sex education in the United States is abysmal at best, and that is being generous. Currently, only 24 states require mandatory sex education curriculum with 20 of them getting the resources used in this education. The lack of mandated curriculum may be contributing to the fact that 40% of incoming college students do not know what consent entails. Students do not get the education around the complexities of consent, the multifaceted manner which it can work, or how to talk about it with partners. It should be eye-opening to see how the majority of our incoming students and peers do not know about healthy consent.

Right now, there are large issues with our country where we are not educating on sex from a young age yet expecting our students to be able to execute on this. Our current perspective on sex is kind of like giving everyone a terrible driver’s education course with a 30-minute video where we tell them not to speed and then expect new drivers to get into a car and be able to operate it on a busy city highway.

Where there are flaws with sex education on a primary and secondary schooling level, we have opportunities to counteract this in our collegiate system. There are ways we can jump-start these conversations and having healthy, honest conversations about sex. It is not only fun when we do this with our students, but it is also vital. How do we get there?

Shifting the Educational Focus

One of the first aspects of our ongoing campus education needs to focus not only on prevention but engagement and positive education. So often, I talk with administrators or professionals who struggle to get students to come to campus events focused on prevention. When I directly ask students why, they tell me they are tired of being talked down to, are afraid they will attend another presentation where they only hear “no means no” without any other resources, or they fail to be met where they are.

Right now, most education occurring on campuses focuses on prevention education and anti-rape messaging. Both are important in different lights. It is vital our students are educated on prevention techniques, and bystander intervention has its time and place in the world but our students have been inundated with “no means no” education for quite some time. The issue of a lack of healthy sexual education, however, is the fact that for our students who want to have healthy sex, they might not know what it entails or how to have these conversations with their partners.

We need to provide education on anti-rape, yes, but we also need to provide conversations and outlets for conversations on sex. Our students and peers are having sex. Our students and peers want to talk about sex, so it’s important we start to shift the paradigm of our education to not only include prevention messaging but also to focus on sex positive programming.

What is Sex Positive Programming

Sex positive programming is based on the idea that we know individuals are going to have different values toward sex, the types of sex they enjoy, and who they choose to be their sexual partners. When we shift our focus to sex positivity, we are emphasizing that difference and diversity in sex is meaningful, so long as sexual partners agree on the types of sex, they are in engaging in. The need for consent in sex positivity is widely discussed because both partners need to be on the same page, but when we approach sex from a sex positive mindset, we are focused on empowering individuals to enjoy their sex instead of feeling ashamed for liking something different.

With sex positive programming, we help our students and peers feel that their sex is healthy and normal, because our emphasis lies in teaching how to get to a point where these dialogues are occurring, and students feel validated in their desires to talk about sex with partners.

Creating a Shift in Our Programming

Part of the method used to encourage discussion about sex on our campuses and reinvigorating sex positivity lie in the types of education we are providing. There should be a healthy mix of sex positive and prevention-based education occurring yes, but in short, we need to add a jump-start programs allowing us to talk about sex.

There are a few different aspects of this:

Campus Resources Built Around Sex Positivity

Think about the types of resources and numbers we are handing out during our sexual assault prevention programs. Often, the numbers or contacts I see given are geared towards prevention and emergency services. Many campus resources are reactive and geared towards the mindset of “if you see something” or “something happens” come to us for support.

These resources need to be provided, yes, but more can also be given. Where can students go if they are curious about sex or want to talk about things they are curious about? What services exist on campus meant to educate on healthy relationships? Are there other programs or events that exist on how to enjoy and make the most out of sex? Are we providing people places to have these types of dialogues?

If these resources exist on campus, we need to educate on their availability. If these resources fail to exist, how can we challenge ourselves to create them for our students?

Intentionality in How We Are Marketing Our Events

I see either one of two ways towards encouraging students to come to sexual assault prevention events. There is the “you are required because you fall in X population” method or there are the “let’s blast out information and hope people show up.” When I talk with students at my event, however, I hear intriguing aspects. Some are shocked at how down-to-earth or refreshing the event was or that they are happy they came because they were originally skeptical that they were just going to get yelled at the entire time.

The perception students have towards these types of events are a massive failing on the side of our campuses. If students feel like they are just going to be yelled at and lectured or told what they are doing is bad, no wonder we have a lack of students showing up to events on sexual assault prevention, let alone shying away from these conversations in the first place.

There needs to be an emphasis on how we are marketing our programs, especially if we are starting to move toward sex positivity. We need to reinforce the learning outcomes for these events and what our offices hope students will receive because of their programs. When encouraging our students to be active participants in these programs, start focusing on why students will want to engage and the type of marketing you are putting out there. Be clear about the difference in events. And get student buy-in when setting up these events to give them a voice in the programming instead of making them passive participants.

Programs Built Around Healthy Sex Education

In shifting our resources made available and the marketing around these resources, we are at the beginning of change. A part of it also stems from the actual events, programming and education we use to engage our students. Now, your campus is likely different from others so a part of this education will be reliant on your culture and should be developed in conjunction with your students and peers. There are a few programs I have seen on other campuses that have worked extremely well, including;

  1. Hosting a panel of professionals or individuals from different sexual orientations, backgrounds, and preferences to allow students to ask questions in a moderated forum. For best success, moderators screen questions submitted through text and maintains the integrity of the event.
  2. Working with professionals or on-campus individuals to host workshops explaining different cultures of sex and sex positivity, providing campus education about these aspects. Workshops including topics such as BDSM, polyamory, and other subcultures of sexual preference.
  3. Campaigns built around educating on healthy sex in the form of flyers, posters, and subverting traditional prevention messages to focus on sex positivity.
  4. Tabling to offer information on different birth control techniques and begin larger dialogues
  5. Peer educator groups that meet regularly for facilitated conversations on healthy sex and provide a campus climate for conversations on sex

When building programs on sexual positivity, focus on working directly with students as a means of creating these events. Instead of focusing on only providing events around prevention, let’s turn our shift to educating on healthy sex and the role it plays on our campus.

I know there is no one silver bullet in preventing sexual assault or providing the one type of education for our students. Even in my training, I focus on both sides of the coin where I discuss predatory behavior and preventative measures while also spending time on sex positivity and how to have better conversations around consent with partners, friends, and peers. The reasons for this are intentional because all forms of these conversations are needed. If I knew the answer on how to end sexual assault, I would have implemented it years ago. Shifting to include healthy conversations on sex is not the solution, but it is a solution.

When we consider our current educational means, we need to start talking more proactively about sex, decisions around the topic, and healthy consent, all as a means of providing a poorly illuminated perspective that has failed to be taught in the United States.

There is one thing I always think of when I discuss this topic; our students want to be talking about sex, yet our educational systems have constantly failed to provide the proper tools in having these conversations. There are great opportunities available in how we are having conversations with our students on these topics, along with a great need.

In the future of sexual assault education on campuses, it’s time we start having the sex talk; God knows very few other places are having it.

 

Learn more about speaker Tim Mousseau at campuspeak.com/mousseau.

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Letting Go to Get Everything http://www.campuspeak.com/lettinggo/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 14:04:45 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25468 The more I have learned to LET GO, the more life fulfillment I have received. As I look back on the life lessons I experienced over the years, the Law of Detachment is one of the most valuable principles that I practice daily. The Law of Detachment enables a person to maximize growth within the […]

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Kinja Dixon

The more I have learned to LET GO, the more life fulfillment I have received.

As I look back on the life lessons I experienced over the years, the Law of Detachment is one of the most valuable principles that I practice daily. The Law of Detachment enables a person to maximize growth within the present moment without factoring in what has happened in the past or what will occur in the future.

To be completely upfront, there was a time in my life, about a decade ago, where it was all about me. Self-preservation is a must, but as I have analyzed my real intentions, they were very selfish. The words “I” and “my” were used as my go-to description of what my life objectives were focused on. My point had to be heard… My feelings had to be practiced… My way or the highway… I have to be #1… I have to make sure that I am taken care of. The list goes on and on.

I sincerely had no idea how limiting this thought process was. I’m not trying to say that to maximize the quality of your life you should not take care of yourself. Please read on and be patient because by the end of this article it will make much more sense.

In 2009, I started to transform my perspective. I starting learning, studying and implementing certain principles in my daily life. My perceptions of how to live changed, too. “My” and “I” became more inclusive because I started to look at the world as one moving part with trillions of subparts that we are universally a part of. The deeper the understanding of this concept, the more I was able to LET GO.

For example, when I got up to 300 pounds in 2009, I took the time to reflect on my patterns at the time. They included me eating whenever I was supposedly “hungry.” I became attached to a way of living that my body did not like. On top of my self-assessment, as the “my” in my life started to include family members, friends, and mentees that were looking up to me, I felt more compelled to be a role model and leader in all aspects of my life. Because I was financially independent and #1  in my sales career, I did not put the same attention on my core ability which was my health. I had to LET GO of that belief system, which led me to hire a nutritionist/body builder/personal trainer who helped put me on a path to gaining my physical freedom.

The old “I” used to abuse alcohol and disguise it as a celebration. I had become accustomed to using different forms of outside stimulation every time I did something that was considered good. The new “I” started to take a look at the track record of my reckless decision-making processes and decided to make a drastic change. I didn’t realize this at the time, but once again, the new definition included much more benefit to the ALL versus treating my emotional void that I had due to “my” lack of personal development at the time. I permanently LET GO of my habit of drinking October 31st, 2009.

Those are just two examples, but so many people, thoughts, and actions have been LET GO of and replaced as I have grown and developed. Evolution cannot take place with a transformation, and a true transformation requires emotional and physical vulnerability. I sincerely believe that we were all born in a state of pure perfection and the more that we have allowed life to add emotional baggage to us, the more we have been pulled from our true potential.

The only question left to ask is: what are you willing to LET GO of today that will help you get to the places you deserve to go in your lifetime?

Learn more about speaker Kinja Dixon: campuspeak.com/dixon.

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Top 5 Ways to Kick Off the Fall Semester http://www.campuspeak.com/fallkickoff/ Tue, 11 Jul 2017 12:50:56 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25300 We’ve all been there. It’s the first week of school, and everyone is reconnecting after being gone over the summer break, or new students are trying to make new friends within a new community. Whether you’re considering a new student organization, fraternity/sorority recruitment, a sports team, or even just wanting to make new friends, here are […]

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Bobby Gordon

We’ve all been there. It’s the first week of school, and everyone is reconnecting after being gone over the summer break, or new students are trying to make new friends within a new community. Whether you’re considering a new student organization, fraternity/sorority recruitment, a sports team, or even just wanting to make new friends, here are some tips to kick off your semester in a positive way:

1. Remember, this is a marathon, not a sprint.
The first few weeks of school will fly by, and you’ll be at mid-terms soon enough. There’s no need to feel the pressure to try to keep up with friends, go out almost every night of the week, and try and catch up with everyone you missed over summer break while drinking too much alcohol. Pace yourself, take your time and be strategic about which events you may or may not choose to drink.

2. The first week of school is the most important.
You may not realize it, but the habits and thoughts you form during the first week of school will stick with you throughout the entire semester. Don’t allow alcohol to distract you from understanding the syllabus, setting a calendar or major deadlines for assignments and tests for the whole semester, or from keenly listening to instructions from your professors. Many faculty members report that students often overlook the syllabus, miss deadlines and end up earning lower grades because they either ignore or don’t pay attention to key instructions provided in the first few classes and the syllabus.

3. Your health is as important as your grades.
Many students find themselves in the student health center within the first few weeks of classes, feeling run down or afflicted with whatever is going around. Keep your immunity up by thoughtfully considering how alcohol consumption lowers your immunity and exposes you to more illnesses, viruses, and bacteria. A strong immune system at the beginning of the semester will help you have better attendance, which can lead to better grades.

4. Your personal time is valuable.
Try not to overcommit; whether it be through leadership positions, volunteering, working, and/or social time. Consider kicking off the semester with a balanced schedule that provides personal time for you to sleep, recover, and enjoy the longevity of the semester in its entirety. That balance also includes not overindulging in alcohol, giving you more time to be social and focus on school, resulting in less time spent recovering from a hangover.

5. Do coursework early.
No, seriously. Make time to do your school work early. Reading chapters ahead or doing assignments or exercises at the beginning of the semester can help not only to save you time as the semester goes on but can provide you with a stronger foundation for learning the topics presented. You may find yourself scoring higher on tests and quizzes by not allowing alcohol to interfere with your school work and preparing for classes early in the semester. Intentionally set aside time for working ahead where you can, so that when mid-terms, finals and other crunch times arise, you’ll have time to devote to them – maybe with time to spare!

 

Learn more about speaker Bobby Gordon at campuspeak.com/gordon.

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A Letter of Encouragement to my Younger Self http://www.campuspeak.com/letter/ Tue, 11 Jul 2017 12:12:00 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25281 When I was in college, there were moments when I thought I knew who I really was, but I was afraid to embrace the idea that I might be “different” from others, or that I may not be exactly what I thought was expected of me. I was scared to open up and explore my […]

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Jeremy Wallace

When I was in college, there were moments when I thought I knew who I really was, but I was afraid to embrace the idea that I might be “different” from others, or that I may not be exactly what I thought was expected of me. I was scared to open up and explore my sexual orientation and gender identity, and to let others in on my struggles. As I had done in my earlier years, I went through my college years hiding my true self, and as a result, I excluded myself from enjoying campus life and being a part of my university, all because I was afraid. I was scared that my family and friends would leave me; afraid I would be treated differently, and even afraid of being hurt. It wasn’t until I graduated that I began to deal with my identity struggles, embrace my true self and live out loud in a way that best represented who I was. I know that many LGBTQ students feel this way. I can honestly say, if I could have a do-over, I would change some things.

Now, as an out, visible transgender identified person, with much more life experience, I can reflect on my college days, and instead of wishing I known more, and come out earlier, I decided to write my much younger, closeted self a letter of encouragement.

Dear younger, struggling, closeted me,

First and foremost, you will be okay, and even though life may feel overwhelming and scary at times, have patience and go easy on yourself. You are doing the best you can, and that is enough. Keep getting up every morning, dust yourself off when you stumble or fall, and know that it will, in fact, get better. Always remember you get to decide who you are, how that is expressed and what the timeframe for change is. There isn’t a deadline or even a finish line, for that matter. Sorry to tell you, but you will always be evolving and growing, but you will soon realize, that’s the richness of life.

Slow down and enjoy the journey. College is a great time to learn and explore, and figure some things out. Don’t buy into to figure “it” all out, no one ever does. You won’t even be able to define what “it” is anyways, so just relax. Oh, a heads up, you will choose a major and never work in that field of study so enjoy the experience, and it will all work itself out. Take the classes that interest and challenge you. Keep your focus and learn as much as you can, and sometimes those 8 AM classes are the best ones you will ever take. And if not, be responsible and get up and go to class anyway. Just do your thing with confidence and don’t worry if you feel that everyone else in the class is talking about you because you may dress, look or act differently, or that it may not be “obvious” what pronouns you use or what gender you are attracted to. You will soon learn that nothing is ever obvious and never make assumptions because once again, everyone, including you, gets to identify themselves, not the other way around. And more importantly, your classmates are probably worrying about themselves and not noticing you.

Trust people. I know this is easier said than done, but you will find many people are far more trustworthy than you give them credit for. It’s your defense mechanism that is clouding your judgment of others, and not everyone will run and leave if they know the real you. In fact, the exact opposite will happen for you. The trick is to show up to relationships, share a little more of yourself than you are used to, and help others to trust you. This will be challenging, I know, but taking a few steps outside your comfort zone and letting people in will be worth it. You’ll find the more you show up on an emotional level in any relationship, the trust will be reciprocated much more easily and more often. And, when the time comes to share your story of you authentically are, these will be the folks to lean into. They will have your back and will help you in ways that you may find unimaginable now.

Know the difference between authenticity and transparency. Take the time to figure out and know who you are. Believe in yourself and learn to love who you are becoming. That doesn’t mean you should show everyone, everything. You can be selective, and keep quiet, and that doesn’t diminish your identity or your worth, and you will know the time to be open. Go easy on yourself, and never think you “should” come out. Be visible, or speak up as I’ve been told, “Don’t should on yourself.” As you get older, this concept will make much more sense. Just because you don’t tell everyone your truth, doesn’t mean it takes away from your authenticity.

Ask for help. If you only remember one thing from this letter, I hope that it’s to ask for help. You will be happy that you did, and you won’t feel as lonely and isolated. Yes, it will feel risky and awkward, but asking for help shows your strength, not a weakness. You will find that there are others who are feeling similar anxieties and fears as you, and together, you will figure things out. You’ll be pleasantly surprised that asking for help will not only assist you but will make a difference in someone else’s life, too.

College is going to fly by more quickly than you think, so don’t rush through the experience. This will be the first time living on your own, and it will be scary at first, but know that you will soon grow to love it. This is the time to spread your wings and learn about yourself. While an education is important, growing and maturing is too. Take chances and don’t allow fear to make decisions for you. Whether you decide to live your truth out loud or not, is entirely up to you. Always remember, you are awesome just the way you are, you are enough and always will be, and your future is waiting for you.

Learn more about speaker Jeremy Wallace at campuspeak.com/wallace.

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How to Fail Forward http://www.campuspeak.com/faillforward/ Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:34:17 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=25271 What’s something that scares you the most? For some it’s public speaking, for others, it’s being alone, and for some, it’s the fear of failure. It seems like we’re too afraid to fail and too scared to show our flaws or imperfections. But that’s not life, that’s not real. What if, and just go with me […]

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Dan Faill

What’s something that scares you the most? For some it’s public speaking, for others, it’s being alone, and for some, it’s the fear of failure. It seems like we’re too afraid to fail and too scared to show our flaws or imperfections. But that’s not life, that’s not real. What if, and just go with me on this, what if when we fail, we succeed?

You’ve heard it before: “What would you do if you knew you could not fail?” Ugh, I despise that question. And even though it makes perfect sense on a motivational poster, what if it actually demotivates us? Of course, you’d try anything and everything if you knew you could not fail! And while the whole concept is ideal, I postulate that the reason we don’t try is that we are worried we will fail. I know some people who are afraid of a project failing, so they never start. I call it the “analysis paralysis.” We feel so burdened by all of the possibilities that we opt never to try one and move on to the next. We’ve become so paralyzed, so fearful of failure, that we don’t see it as what it is meant to be – a possibility. What’s that saying? “The possibilities are endless.” It’s true, and so are failures.

I remember the first day of English my sophomore year in high school. My teacher greeted everyone with “Good morning, and welcome to English – at some point in this class; I hope you all fail.” As a fairly decent student, I remember thinking to myself that this woman had lost all her marbles! Here we have a teacher, whose purpose is to educate the next generation of great thinkers, hoping we fail?! Not until later did I understand what she meant. She wanted everyone to fail because at that point something magical happens – you learn.

Believe it or not, what if I told you that you have failed thousands upon thousands of times in your life already? I guarantee there’s an embarrassing home video of you learning to walk because there is nothing funnier than watching a wobbly toddler bobbing around milk drunk, and then falling down. But then what happens? They get back up. And they try again. And they get better. Whether it’s crawling, walking, riding a bike, reading, or writing, no one is perfect when they start.

Taking the notion that no one is perfect, what if we could own our imperfections? And in our imperfections, what if we tried new things? And by trying new things, what if we fail? Wait, what if we fail? So, what?!?! The best part about trying new things is figuring out what you like, what you don’t like; what you’re meant to do, what you’re not meant to do; what potential you have in something you had no idea existed. There’s freedom in failure. There’s self-discovery.

Next time you fail, don’t think of it as a setback. Think of it as a fail forward. You’ll be happy you tried and failed.

Learn more about speaker Dan Faill and his keynote Faill Forward: campuspeak.com/faill.

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CAMPUSPEAK Adds Nine New Keynote Speakers to its Roster for 2017 http://www.campuspeak.com/newspeakers2017/ Wed, 24 May 2017 19:11:35 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=24766 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   Jessica Goodbred-Warren Director of Marketing & Communications p: (844) 745-8570 e: jessica@campuspeak.com   CAMPUSPEAK Adds Nine New Keynote Speakers to its Roster in 2017   May 24, 2017, Orlando, FL – CAMPUSPEAK announced today the addition of nine new keynote speakers to its roster for 2017. CAMPUSPEAK  provides transformative learning experiences to […]

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Jessica Goodbred-Warren
Director of Marketing & Communications
p: (844) 745-8570
e: jessica@campuspeak.com

 

CAMPUSPEAK Adds Nine New Keynote Speakers to its Roster in 2017

 

May 24, 2017, Orlando, FL – CAMPUSPEAK announced today the addition of nine new keynote speakers to its roster for 2017.

CAMPUSPEAK  provides transformative learning experiences to educate and inspire college students and the professionals who work with them. With nearly 50 keynote speakers covering essential topics facing Higher Education today, we impact over 100,000 students each year. Nine new speakers will be welcomed onto our TEAM this coming June who will continue CAMPUSPEAK’s tradition as the most trusted partner in Higher Education since 1999.

“On behalf of the entire CAMPUSPEAK TEAM, we are excited to welcome the nine new speakers to the roster.  It is an incredibly exciting time for CAMPUSPEAK, and the new speaker class will provide cutting edge expertise to our already dynamic speaker roster. I am excited for our speakers to influence, impact and connect with students across the country” said Monica McGee, Chief Operating Officer at CAMPUSPEAK.

The nine new speakers CAMPUSPEAK will be welcoming to the roster include:

Darryl Bellamy – Fearless Leadership

Dan Faill – Failing Forward, Authenticity, Greek Life, Sexual Violence Prevention

Ethan Fisher – Alcohol, Drugs, DUI, Determination and Persistence

Saul Flores – Latino-American Issues, Undocumented Americans, Social Justice, Servant Leadership

Adam Giery – Hazing, Student Involvement

Camille Nelson – Creativity, Change Management

Leslie Nwoke – Emotional Intelligence

Josh Rivedal – Mental Health, Suicide Prevention

Rodney Walker – Overcoming Adversity, Resilience

“Joining the CAMPUSPEAK team is an exciting opportunity,” says our new mental health keynote speaker Josh Rivedal. “I’m ready to work together to educate, entertain, and engage even more college students on mental health and suicide prevention.”

The CAMPUSPEAK website will be adding its new speakers throughout the summer and will be updated completely by the end of July 2017.

About CAMPUSPEAK

Since 1999, CAMPUSPEAK has provided transformative learning experiences through its keynote speakers, interactive workshops, consulting, online education, and custom programs. Partnering with campuses and higher education organizations across the country, CAMPUSPEAK offers programming to educate and inspire students for success in their college years and beyond. Learn more at campuspeak.com.

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