CAMPUSPEAK http://www.campuspeak.com Fri, 24 Feb 2017 19:29:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.3 99955535 I spent 24-hours of my honeymoon playing soccer with Syrian refugees. http://www.campuspeak.com/honeymoon/ Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:29:20 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23944 Ethan Zohn won a million dollars on the TV show Survivor and put the money to good use. As a philanthropist, entrepreneur and college speaker, Ethan dedicates his time to helping others in need and educating his audiences on how they can make a difference. Read his most recent article about how he and his wife […]

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Ethan Zohn

Ethan Zohn won a million dollars on the TV show Survivor and put the money to good use. As a philanthropist, entrepreneur and college speaker, Ethan dedicates his time to helping others in need and educating his audiences on how they can make a difference. Read his most recent article about how he and his wife spent their honeymoon making a positive impact: I spent 24-hours of my honeymoon playing soccer with Syrian refugees.

Learn more about speaker Ethan Zohn and his story: campuspeak.com/zohn.

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Building a legacy through leadership and service. http://www.campuspeak.com/legacyleader/ Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:22:45 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23906 Service is an integral part of leadership. Not only do student leaders have the opportunity to inspire and guide their fellow students. They can also model the importance of serving our communities, and giving to those in need. Someone who modeled this for me was my mother. Here is a story about her: It was […]

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Elaine Penn

Service is an integral part of leadership. Not only do student leaders have the opportunity to inspire and guide their fellow students. They can also model the importance of serving our communities, and giving to those in need.

Someone who modeled this for me was my mother. Here is a story about her:

It was 1990, and I was sitting in the auditorium of my old high school waiting for the show to begin. The lights flickered on and off letting the audience know there were 5 minutes left to the start of the production of Music Music Music. We sat there in great anticipation. Finally, the lights dimmed, the curtains opened, and the audience erupted into applause. Up on the stage were 30 adults with down syndrome, decked out in full costumes, ready to perform their lip-sync number to the song Delta Dawn.

This was the fundraiser my mother had produced for many years for a group called the DDA, (Developmentally Disabled Adults of Rockingham County). My mother worked with the DDA from 1985 to 2011, when she retired.

My mom was the Director of Parks and Recreation in Madison, North Carolina, the small town where I grew up. She had gone back to college when she was 40 years old to major in Therapeutic Recreation. She vowed that went she graduated and got a job; she would hold a special place in her heart for anyone with a disability. And she did!

Each month, as the Director of Parks and Recreation, she offered a program for the DDA. Sometimes it was a Scavenger Hunt. Other times, it was an Elvis Party. (They LOVED Elvis). It could be a dance or a prom. But their favorite program was Music Music Music.

Their parents would make their costumes, and they would rehearse their lines. You would have thought it was a Broadway production. The entire town was “abuzz.”

Every year, my mother would have a cast party after Music Music Music, that was often more entertaining as the show itself. During one cast party, in particular, one of the cast members (of the DDA) went missing. His name was Jimmy, and no one could find him.

I lived in an old three story house with an attic and a basement. We were worried, to say the least.

Eventually, my mother looked into her and my father’s bedroom. As she approached the door, she saw Jimmy standing in front of her mirror. He was surrounded by a pile of her evening gowns. (We had a family jazz band, and those were her costumes). Jimmy had been trying them on one at a time, and looking at himself in the mirror.

My mother stood there for a few moments, smiling at Jimmy. Eventually, she said, “Jimmy, you look dazzling.” Then, she gently escorted him back to the party. My mother greatly enriched their lives. My mother served the DDA.

This is just one example of how my mother taught me the importance of service. She was (and is) a tremendous leader. She built a thriving Parks and Recreation Department that met an entire community’s needs through her programs, services, and activities. She always took the time to inspire and teach her staff, connect with community members; and, bring people together to rally around a common vision. The Recreation Department was the heartbeat of the town.

My mother also gave back to the community that gave so much to her. She helped those in need and supported underrepresented populations. She made everyone feel valuable and important.

My mother built a legacy, and the lessons she taught us will live on forever. She served. She led.

In what ways are you building your legacy? How can you and your organization serve and give back? This is a question that every leader should be asking themselves.

Learn more about speaker Elaine Penn, check out campuspeak.com/penn.

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Words Make a Difference http://www.campuspeak.com/words/ Tue, 21 Feb 2017 20:38:04 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23876   Recognizing people is one the most important parts of being a leader, and it’s also one of my favorite parts. Praising and complimenting others has always come naturally to me, and I love making people feel good about themselves. But the first time I remember my positive words really making an impact on someone […]

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Kristen Hadeed

 

Recognizing people is one the most important parts of being a leader, and it’s also one of my favorite parts. Praising and complimenting others has always come naturally to me, and I love making people feel good about themselves. But the first time I remember my positive words really making an impact on someone was soon after I started a cleaning company when I was in college.

It was in the middle of what we call “move-out season,” which takes place in the dead of summer. I was leading a large team at an apartment complex, where we were tasked with cleaning about 100 units that day. My company is based in Gainesville, Florida, so as you can imagine, it’s Really. Freaking. Hot. Add that to cleaning empty apartments where people have lived for years—sometimes without cleaning them at all—and you’ve got a recipe for misery. To get my team through the move-out season, it takes a lot of encouragement.

I was making my rounds to each apartment, delivering water to teams and thanking them for working so hard. In one of the units I visited, two students were working together in a kitchen.

I greeted them and handed them each a water bottle. Then I consulted my list and realized there should be another person in the apartment.

“Isn’t there someone else with you?” I asked.

“Yeah,” one of the students said. “He’s… down that way, cleaning one of the bathrooms.”

The way she said it made me think something was up, so I set off down the hallway. When I reached the bathroom, I looked through a doorway at Bill, who was cleaning a toilet the slowest I’d ever seen anyone clean anything in my life. He was standing hunched over, his toilet brush dangling from his hand, barely moving.

“Bill! How are you doing?” I asked cheerfully, hoping it might startle him into action.

No such luck. When he looked up at me, he was pale. He was sweating and had big bags under his eyes like he hadn’t slept in days. To my horror, I noticed a dead roach sitting on his sneaker. He didn’t even see it. He looked so utterly exhausted that I was surprised he was still standing—and that he hadn’t quit yet.

Not knowing what else to do, I looked at the other two students who had wandered over to us.

“Guys,” I whispered, hoping Bill wouldn’t hear me. “What should we do?”

They looked at one another, then back at me, and shrugged.

We needed Bill. We were in the middle of a do-or-die day with a big deadline fast approaching; I had to do something to motivate him.

“Man, Bill!” I shouted, not sure what I was going to say next. “I have never seen anyone clean a toilet as well as you!” (Faster, yes. But he at least seemed to be cleaning it thoroughly).

Caught off-guard, Bill looked up and lazily half-smiled.

I looked at the other two students, raising my eyebrows and silently urging them to follow my lead.

“Oh! Um, yeah, Bill! Wow!” one piped up, catching on. “Where did you learn how to clean toilets?”

“Seriously, Bill, you’re the man!” the other chimed in.

Bill was slowly perking up. He’d even cracked a grin.

“Bill for president!” one of them shouted. Probably a little overkill, but Bill loved it. He started standing up a little straighter, the color returned to his face, and he was smiling like he had just come back from a five-day cruise to the Bahamas. He still didn’t notice the roach on his sneaker, but he started pumping his toilet brush in the air as the rest of us chanted, “Bill! Bill! Bill!”

As I left that apartment, I spotted Bill, grin still in place, scrubbing that toilet with gusto—and probably a little more than the job required. When I checked in with him and his team later that day, he was still going strong. I realized I was smiling, too. It felt so good to see that change in Bill and realizing that the little bit of cheerleading his teammates and I did had made such a huge difference.

People thrive on positive recognition, and it’s up to leaders to provide it. Encouraging people makes them want to work harder and do better, so really, it’s a win-win: You feel good for making others feel good, and in turn, they want to continue doing things that earn them good feedback.

But there’s a sweet spot for giving recognition. If it’s given too often, it becomes meaningless. And if it’s not given often enough, it’s not nearly as effective. Studies show that to have the biggest impact, the ratio of positive to negative feedback should be 5 to 1. That means someone needs to get positive recognition five times as often as they get negative or critical feedback.

So, the next time you want to motivate your members, try a little cheerleading. And it doesn’t have to happen in an awards ceremony or even in front of a crowd: Giving out awards is great, but it’s the everyday recognition that makes a difference.

Learn more about speaker Kristen Hadeed, check out campuspeak.com/hadeed.

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Fill Their Bucket http://www.campuspeak.com/bucket/ Tue, 21 Feb 2017 18:51:23 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23847   As a student of leadership, I’m always looking for pragmatic concepts that I can add to my toolbox, and especially ones that I can incorporate into my keynote speeches. Enter Child Psychology 101. My wife and I have two kids. Roman is four and Sylvia is two. We love them to death, and in […]

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Jon Tasch

 

As a student of leadership, I’m always looking for pragmatic concepts that I can add to my toolbox, and especially ones that I can incorporate into my keynote speeches.

Enter Child Psychology 101.

My wife and I have two kids. Roman is four and Sylvia is two. We love them to death, and in our minds, they truly are our little angels. But sometimes, as you might imagine, they don’t always demonstrate angelic behavior.

Up until recently, well, let’s just say they were in the habit of displaying remarkably “spirited” behavior. My wife’s and my patience was pushed to the limit, and we arrived at a point where we both agreed we needed some professional help.

We made a beeline for the Google search bar and found a child behavioral expert who bases her methodology on what is known as Adlerian Psychology. One of her premises is that if you want well-behaved children, you must satisfy their need for attention and power.

At the end of her one-hour webinar, we were sold on the promise that inside her magic box lay all the secrets for putting an end to all of that undesired negative behavior, of which our kids seemed to have an endless supply. She had shown us the light, and we were ready for her six-week course.

Early on in the program, we learned that children (1) don’t experience an adequate amount of attention and (2) don’t feel empowered, through no fault of their own, they act out in the only ways they know how, usually in the form of temper tantrums, whining, and innumerable other ways that have caused my wife and I to lose our (insert expletive) on more occasions than we care to admit.

Children are instinctively smart. They know that when they act out, they are likely to be awarded a whole bunch of attention, and it usually arrives rather quickly. Attention bucket filled.

And when they don’t get what they want or are given demanding orders – when they don’t feel empowered – their fits of rage are often neutralized with whatever it is they wanted (the candy, the toy, the extra 30 minutes of TV time, etc.). Power bucket filled.

Simply put, children want to have a say in things, and they want to feel significant. After going through the training, I’m happy to say that my wife and I have learned strategies to prevent meltdowns by filling their attention and power buckets in healthy positive ways.

As adults, we are no different than children in our need for attention and power. We crave these things just as much as they do. My time as a military officer and as an FBI Agent taught me that. The difference though is how we behave when we don’t experience adequate amounts of attention or power.

Think about it from an organizational perspective.

When we don’t feel empowered, and when we aren’t recognized for our effort and contribution (no matter how small), instead of temper tantrums and whining fits, as adults we become apathetic, disengaged, and do just enough to get by.

As a leader, it is your job to help the people around you become a better version of themselves. When you fill their attention and power buckets, you give them an invaluable gift and, in turn, you give your organization one as well.

When we feel like we have a say in things and that what we do matters, we will go above and beyond and put our heart and soul into whatever it is that we are doing. I challenge you to be the type of leader who gives people the opportunity to do that.

Learn more about keynote speaker Jon Tasch visit: campuspeak.com/tasch.

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The Power of Belonging http://www.campuspeak.com/powerbelonging/ Fri, 17 Feb 2017 18:45:46 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23813       Over the last four years, I have engaged in an in-depth inquiry into the nature of fraternal brotherhood and sisterhood. I have learned a great deal about the fraternal experience in those four years, and have published and presented research that I think represents a fundamental shift in focus for those of us […]

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Gentry McCreary

 

Over the last four years, I have engaged in an in-depth inquiry into the nature of fraternal brotherhood and sisterhood. I have learned a great deal about the fraternal experience in those four years, and have published and presented research that I think represents a fundamental shift in focus for those of us working in the fraternity/sorority industry.

Of all that we have learned, one finding stands out above the others: a brotherhood or sisterhood based on belonging – a feeling of connectedness and mattering – is the single most important aspect of the fraternal experience.

In our research, we have quantitatively studied over 30,000 fraternity and sorority members, and have engaged in in-depth qualitative analysis, hearing from fraternity and sorority members themselves about the experiences that shape their feelings of brotherhood and sisterhood. And those students have resoundingly stated, over and over again, in their own words and in their answers to survey questions, that a feeling of belonging is of paramount importance.

Belonging is the single most powerful predictor of retention in fraternities and sororities. It is the single most important predictor of overall satisfaction with the fraternity/sorority experience. It is the single most important predictor of organizational commitment and attachment. And belonging is the key that opens the door to the most altruistic versions of brotherhood and sisterhood – a drive to hold one another to high standards and to strive together to achieve greatness. Show me a chapter with retention issues, motivation issues, or involvement issues, and I’ll show you a chapter with belonging issues. The importance of a brotherhood or sisterhood based on belonging cannot be overstated.

But as I have studied and talked with fraternity and sorority members across the country, I have reached a troubling conclusion – the vast majority of our undergraduate chapters do not actively or consciously work towards creating a sense of belonging to their members. Even in chapters that measure high on belonging, we often see the haphazard nature of the connections within the group. Only the very best fraternities and sororities are actively working, in every aspect of chapter life, to create that sense of belonging among members.

Luckily, we have studied those groups who make strides towards creating a sense of belonging. We understand how they recruit. We understand how they organize their new member education programs. We know the types of brotherhood and sisterhood activities they host, how they socialize, and how they hold one another accountable. In our qualitative study of the “best” fraternities and sororities nationally, we have gleaned lessons that I am now ready to share with fraternity and sorority everywhere.

My new keynote program, “The Power of Belonging” is the culmination of this research. In it, I help students understand the importance of belonging, and provide them with powerful and effective strategies aimed at creating a stronger sense of belonging in their chapters. In doing so, I help fraternity and sorority members rethink their approaches recruitment, new member education, accountability, brother/sisterhood programming. The result? Students will leave this program with a fresh perspective on what matters in fraternity and sorority, motivated to refocus their efforts on the creation of belonging, and equipped with tried-and-true strategies to build a stronger sense of belonging among their members.

The importance of belonging cannot be overstated. It is the single most important aspect of the fraternal experience, and “The Power of Belonging” may be the single most important message the students in your community need to hear.

Learn more about keynote speaker, Gentry McCreary and his new keynote: campuspeak.com/mccreary.

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I cannot make you change. But I can change me. http://www.campuspeak.com/change/ Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:26:57 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23684     “If only my spouse/child/parent/boss would change…” To focus our attention on what we can’t control produces suffering. You and I have limited resources. We have finite time, energy and attention. When we expend those resources on what is beyond our control, suffering ensues. That suffering is a sign. It means we’re out of […]

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Joel Nunez

 

 

“If only my spouse/child/parent/boss would change…”

To focus our attention on what we can’t control produces suffering.

You and I have limited resources. We have finite time, energy and attention. When we expend those resources on what is beyond our control, suffering ensues. That suffering is a sign. It means we’re out of balance with the natural order of things. It means we’re not harnessing our limited resources towards doing what we can do because we’ve opted to focus on what we cannot do.

I cannot make you change. But I can change me. Often, that’s enough to ease my suffering.

Every week, I meet with courageous people in the therapy room. People from all walks of life who are struggling to overcome challenges impeding them from becoming their best selves. Too many have been the victims of unspeakable abuse, neglect, or crimes they did nothing to merit. For these folks, empowerment comes from the paradoxical truth that although what happened to them long ago was not their fault, today they have the moral responsibility to assume ownership over the effects of their earlier trauma. Then, no longer are they passive victims, but can begin to forge a new meaning from their experiences and chart a new path of their choosing.

What happened to me yesterday may not have been my fault. What do I do with today is my responsibility.

Be well.
Joel

Learn more about speaker Dr. Joel Núñez, check out campuspeak.com/nunez.

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The Perfect Love Affair #PLA http://www.campuspeak.com/loveaffair/ Wed, 08 Feb 2017 14:40:19 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23644       “Love is patient, and love is kind…” or so the story is told. There is a moment when you think about your personal love, and sometimes it leads to warm fuzzy moments or cold realities of the bad decisions you have made in your lifetime. We often find ourselves waiting for someone […]

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Sara Lowery

 

“Love is patient, and love is kind…” or so the story is told.

There is a moment when you think about your personal love, and sometimes it leads to warm fuzzy moments or cold realities of the bad decisions you have made in your lifetime.

We often find ourselves waiting for someone to say how much they like us, or even how much they love us. But sometimes the voice that we need to hear to say those things belongs to us. Why do we find ourselves waiting on others to acknowledge our existence when we may have walked by five mirrors and didn’t acknowledge ourselves?

I know this may be too deep, especially if you just stumbled across this article while eating your morning Cheerios. However, I have a responsibility to share with some and remind others. Does the love affair that you seek, start with yourself first? Loving yourself first is what I call the PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR! No one is going to love you better than you. No one is going to encourage, motivate and inspire you to stay strong more than you can.

I know that this may cause you to be a bit vulnerable. However, this is what creates inner strength. Brené Brown says it best:

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”

You’ve heard this before, but allow me to reintroduce you to this phrase – You can’t worry about the haters. You have to be prepared to lead your haters. Hence the reason that self-love is so important. When you can be vulnerable and love yourself, you can become vulnerable, with others, and when others see that vulnerability, their trust in you will be established. Then, friends, we have the making of a great leader! Trust me. I prescribe to this medicine of vulnerability – I take it at least three times daily, and I know I am getting stronger.

Want to start your regiment? Here are the directions for this medication. Each morning you should be able to look in the mirror (preferably before you wash your face and get dressed for the day), say and do the following:

  1. “Oh, how I love me some me.” Then, give yourself a huge smile.
  2. “I am valuable.” As you get stronger, list ways in which you are valuable.
  3. “I woke up this morning because I have a purpose.”
  4. “Someone needs me today, and it may only be my smile, but even this gorgeous smile can turn a frown upside-down.”

At first, this may seem silly, and you might feel silly doing it. Some of you may not get past just staring at yourself. And for those that can’t face the mirror right now, I understand. It was a process for me before I could look in the mirror and say that I love me some me. Write your thoughts, feelings, and experiences in a journal, then move to a Post-it®, then graduate to sticking Post-its® to a mirror. Before you know it, you will be saying them out loud to yourself each day.

Sometimes life situations have a way of beating us down. Trust me; I have been there! But we have to fight back and take control in our internal so that our external can be accurate and authentic, kind and compassionate. We want our external, the person that others see – to be inspirational, to portray us as a motivated leader that helps others, and show that we are supportive and encouraging. The only way that can happen is if we start that PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR with ourselves.

Check me out on Instagram and Twitter and inspire others and share with me your PERFECT LOVE AFFAIR, #PLA @saraempowers_u.

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Sara Lowery and her keynotes: campuspeak.com/lowery.

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How to Mistake Your Way to Your Best Self http://www.campuspeak.com/bestself/ Mon, 06 Feb 2017 20:08:44 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23625 It’s pretty uncommon these days for anyone to encourage you to make a mistake, let alone celebrate one. A mistake is considered to be the opposite of a success and therefore something to be avoided in our success-focused culture. But what if I told you that it’s not so simple – that mistakes are crucial for […]

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Brady Gill
It’s pretty uncommon these days for anyone to encourage you to make a mistake, let alone celebrate one. A mistake is considered to be the opposite of a success and therefore something to be avoided in our success-focused culture. But what if I told you that it’s not so simple – that mistakes are crucial for your personal growth and that avoiding mistakes is the best way to keep you from being your most successful self? What would you do? How would you live a life where mistakes were marvelous?

First off, you have to believe that mistakes are great!

We have spent most of our lives being told to avoid mistakes. Almost every test we take in school sends that message. If you want a good grade, don’t make any mistakes. A good grade is considered the key to a good school, which is the key to a good job, which is our key to a good life. Anything that derails that imaginary path is a bad thing. But take some time to think about your life when you learned the most about yourself and others. Did they come from easy successes? Or did they come from epic fails? Perhaps it was the success you found after the trials, obstacles, and mistakes you had to experience to get there? My guess is it was the latter.

Mistakes have changed the world for the better!

All you have to do is look back in history to see all the mistakes that we benefit from today. The microwave was invented because Percy Spencer was trying to create a new vacuum tube. He noticed that by mistake, he was also melting a candy bar in his pocket. One dirty shirt ended up meaning microwaves for all! Not a fan of Hot Pockets? How about penicillin? While working with bacteria, Alexander Fleming found that one of his Petri dishes was contaminated with mold. But one failed experiment led to the start of something amazing when the mold seemed to counteract the present bacteria. If Fleming were being tested, he would have failed. But instead, he invented modern antibiotics! Now your mistakes might not lead to inventions that will change the world, but they will teach you things that can change your life.

Stop being afraid to make mistakes!

We hear it all the time, “take the road less traveled,” and “think outside the box,” when we apply to schools and for jobs where we want to “stand out” and be “different from the rest.” That’s hard to do when you’re scared of making mistakes. It’s the fear of mistakes that keeps us from trying new things or taking risks. Our bodies have evolved to keep us safe. Anytime we think we’re in danger; our bodies flush with adrenaline and hormones that are designed to make us FIGHT or FLIGHT. Neither of these reactions are necessary when you’re trying to sing karaoke, or just admitting to someone that you have no idea what they are talking about, but you’d like to learn. The more we can train ourselves to be less scared of our mistakes, the more courageous and confident we’ll be in the world.

Celebrate mistakes and make them often.

I’m not saying that you should go out of your way to mess up. Don’t intentionally crash your car or cheat on your partner because you’re gonna learn something from it. But just knowing that mistakes can be positive will free us from many of our inhibitions. Here are some ways that you can start “mistaking” your way to your best self.

  • Be reflective. When you make a mistake, take the time to think about what you can learn from it. Sometimes this won’t be clear right away, and that’s okay. It took me years to learn from the mistakes that I made in my last relationship, but now I’m grateful for what I know now. Some great ways to make sure you’re reflecting is to start a regular journal writing practice or put up a prompt somewhere in your home that asks you to think about what mistakes you’ve made recently and what you’re learning.
  • Be generous and share. We tend to hide our mistakes because we believe they are embarrassing or make us weak. If mistakes are as wonderful as we say they are, then why shouldn’t we share them with the world? By being open about mistakes, you’re normalizing them both for yourself and for those you share them with. Our mistakes then stop being so scary and everyone gets to benefit from them.
  • Be playful. Almost any game you play is an exercise in making mistakes and learning from them. Whether it’s on a soccer field or playing a board game, playing is a constant form of improv, and small-stakes risk taking. It’s the reason that most intelligent animals play when they’re young. And if games aren’t your thing, there are lots of ways to play. Rockclimbing, creative writing, even organizing your bedroom can be a form of play as long as you make it fun and engaging.

Imagine your playful life where mistakes are celebrated. What would you finally try that you never have? Who’s that person that you would finally talk to? Who would you get to be? While the answer for each of us is different, many of the results are the same. A more dynamic life, where creativity and innovation flow with ease. A life where we are more curious and open with those around us. Life with less fear and more LIFE! It’s the life I’d like to live, and I hope you would too.

So let’s start making mistakes together and see where we can go!

 

Learn more about speaker Brady Gill and how to bring him to campus: http://www.campuspeak.com/gill.

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Selling is Synonymous with Success http://www.campuspeak.com/selling/ Mon, 06 Feb 2017 18:46:53 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23619     “I do not have the personality to be a great salesperson.” I may be the first one to tell you this, but personally believing in that statement can be a major hindrance to your personal and business progression. Out of every ten salespeople that you meet, two usually have the personality of a […]

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Kinja Dixon

 

“I do not have the personality to be a great salesperson.”

I may be the first one to tell you this, but personally believing in that statement can be a major hindrance to your personal and business progression. Out of every ten salespeople that you meet, two usually have the personality of a great salesperson. The ones that we usually run into are the other eight, and unfortunately, until the message from this article spreads to the general public, the stereotypes that come with the personality of a salesperson will continue to push possible buyers away. These traits include:

  • aggressive
  • over-talkers
  • impatient
  • not genuine
  • egotistical

Those are just a few, but these are usually characteristics that someone who agreed with my opening statement is thinking about when assessing the personality type os a salesperson. The previous traits are not only unproductive for someone in sales, but also for anyone in life.

What Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Andrew Carnegie, and Henry Ford have in common is that they were some of the greatest salesmen who have ever lived. The ideas that they persuaded others to buy into had a generational impact that has had an effect on the way we all live today. The mindset of a great salesperson involves understanding human behavior that they demonstrate through their passionate delivery of their message.

What the average person deals with is the total opposite when it comes to sales. They deal with an overly assumptive person who usually does not allow proper communication, and those types of experiences cause the buyer to carry defenses into future encounters with salespeople. The great salesperson recognizes and addresses the defense while aiming to get on a positive track, while the eighty percent fight fire with fire, leaving yet another bad impression on the title os a salesperson and the cycle continues.

When you buy an idea, product or service from someone that used the correct techniques, you feel as if you’re on a pedestal. The pride of making a wise decision, mixed with the genuine connection what made, is one of the best combinations of emotions that one could ever have. Having a personality geared to deliver these feelings benefits every person involved in the exchange.

Once you take a closer look at the personality type of a great salesperson, you will immediately understand that the traits instilled will help attain success in anything you will ever do. The vast majority of any sales force that you run into lacks these characteristics because of the intent to “make a sale,” eliminates the focus on the skills that are needed to help them strive for true mastery of the art of entrepreneurship.

These are a few of the traits that come with the master salesperson:

  • enthusiastic
  • great listener
  • optimistic
  • goal-oriented
  • confident

The person who can sell him or herself will be much better as selling others, so it all starts with knowing how to be self-motivated. The individuals in this world who encounter the worst physical, financial and emotional trauma are usually victims of not being able to sell themselves on their first presentation because they did not execute the proper action. Now that you have a better understanding of what comes with the character of a great salesperson, I urge that you take a closer look at who you are and what type of foundation your personality is built upon.

Kinja Dixon is an internationally award-winning sales management expert and motivational speaker. In 2013, Dixon won both the Gold Stevie Award and American Resort Development Association Award (ARDA) for Top In-House Salesperson, making him one of the most accomplished salespeople alive today. In Universal Talk Laws: How to Increase Your Net Worth With Words, Dixon offers practical advice on the art of verbal communication. For more information, visit www.kinjadixon.com.

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Kinja Dixon and how to bring him to campus: campuspeak.com/dixon.

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Leadership Misconceptions: How Extraordinary Leaders Inspire and Lead Differently http://www.campuspeak.com/misconceptions/ Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:27:06 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23525   Leadership is… action, not position. transformation, not a transaction. influence, not management. a verb, not a noun. Whether I am speaking to student audiences or corporate organizations, the challenges and frustrations I hear leaders talk about have common threads. The seasoned executive and department manager are very likely dealing with many of the same […]

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Kevin Snyder

Leadership is…

action, not position.
transformation, not a transaction.
influence, not management.
a verb, not a noun.

Whether I am speaking to student audiences or corporate organizations, the challenges and frustrations I hear leaders talk about have common threads. The seasoned executive and department manager are very likely dealing with many of the same issues as the student leader.

“Others just don’t seem to care as much.”
“If only people did what they said they’d do!”
“Why can’t we get more people involved?”
“20% of us are doing 80% of the work!”
etc., etc.

The good news is there are solutions to whatever your frustrations might be. Of course, circumstances are unique for each of us, but leadership principles are universal and span across an age and industry. As long as a leader recognizes the specific changes they desire and are needed, there are ways to make that reality come to life. That’s what effective leaders do. They have a reality check to assess and recognize where they are and then they work with others to get where he/she/they want to be. Where they want to be is a clear vision that they communicate and hold themselves accountable to work toward.

Spoiler Alert! This one article won’t solve all the world’s problems, but it can help us get started. I’ll be diving deeper into what I believe is the most important concept that will help you tackle and work through any challenge you are currently facing. Whether you want to improve your organization, a relationship, or yourself, apply this one principle to begin the journey.

“Remember, it’s not what you know, it’s what you apply.”

Important: Even before the journey begins, leaders know getting to their destination will have its detours, speed bumps, and even unanticipated construction zones. But effective leaders know they will never reach their destination if they take the nearest exit. Leaders finish despite adversity and setbacks. That’s why they are leaders. When other people quit, they don’t. They know their struggles develop their strength. They know setbacks are a setup for an opportunity.

Most of what I’ve learned about effective leadership over the past 20 years hasn’t come from books. In fact, much of what I’ve read about leadership centers around misconceptions. That’s why, in real life, leadership is so tough. Leadership isn’t always fun. Leadership isn’t about what we want to do, rather, it’s about what we ought to do. This is why most people who think they are good at leadership, unfortunately, aren’t. Most people don’t realize what leadership is about until they step into it – literally. Let’s change those misconceptions… so keep reading.

If you’re like me, I learn by doing – not reading. Most of my leadership discoveries have come from my experience speaking to over 500,000 people across 1,150 organizations in all 50 states and numerous countries. I’ve written a few books and been honored to do my own TEDx talk. Through my travels, observations, research, and discussions with people all over the world, I’m more clear than ever before about how an extraordinary leader can inspire and lead differently, and more effectively. These personal experiences have helped me discover that there’s one concept that will melt away the misconceptions about leadership. It seems simple in concept, but I assure you that it’s profound in application. Here it is:

Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. They set expectations.

That’s correct. Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. Instead, extraordinary leaders create a vision of expectation for themselves and others.

Goals are passive aggressive. Goals are a statement of what most people “hope” will happen. The majority of time when someone, or an organization, sets a goal, they like the sound of it. They even believe in it during the moment, but they don’t really understand what a goal requires legs, a body, a heart and even heartache. A goal also needs to be nourished and curated for months, if not years. That’s the reason why six months later 85% of most goals are either forgotten about or never achieved. New Year’s resolutions function the same way.

On the other hand, extraordinary leaders create a vision of expectation. Think about the people who have changed the world, created remarkable inventions and inspired others to greatness. Think of extraordinary athletes, famous authors and advocates for a cause.

Expecting what you desire is the first step toward obtaining it.

You see, when you have an authentic vision for something. It’s very clear in your mind. It’s as if you’ve already achieved it and you expect it to manifest it in your life. But you also know you’ve got to work toward it and never, ever, ever quit. Success should be more about making progress and being happy along the way. How often have you achieved something and then you look around asking, “Now what?”

A few years ago, I was sharing this leadership perspective with a group of fraternity and sorority student leaders during a Greek Week event. Apparently, word spread after my speech and I was asked to share my “idea” at a TEDX event. If you’re like me and you’d rather watch a TED talk than read about it, simply click here to watch. You won’t hurt my feelings. Plus, you’ll get to watch my Price is Right video when I shake Bob Barker’s hand and live my dream of being on the show. That was my vision and expectation years ago.

Here’s the bottom line… I want you to just realize that goals are phrases that look really good on a piece of paper. It’s okay to have them, and you should. Perhaps they can even motivate you for a short period of time, but they’ll soon fade out. A piece of paper with numbers and bullet points isn’t motivating. That document isn’t going to inspire anyone. What’s motivating is knowing that you’re leading, and following others at times, toward achieving a vision. You and your team literally expect that the vision will come to life and you talk about it often. It’s also expected that everyone will work toward it. It’s expected that others will have a role to play so they feel invested in helping obtain it. Make sense?

Instead of making a goal for yourself and your organizations, create a vision of expectation. Perhaps take it to the next level and create a vision board. What is it that will really inspire, ignite and empower others? That’s your vision of expectation! Share that instead of a goal document. Then work backwards. You’ll be amazed at the difference. If you’d like to learn more about how to make a vision board, or how to facilitate this with organizations, contact me. I also have a chapter in my book dedicated to this visioning process and you can get a free copy.

Download your free copy of my book, Think Differently to Achieve Success, by simply visiting my website: KevinCSnyder.com. Enter your email and you’ll receive a message to automatically download my book. Over 25,000 copies have been delivered and I hope you’re next.

Kevin Snyder

I also have a leadership app you can download for free on your phone or iPad. Simply visit your app store and search for KevinCSnyder.

In closing, remember this – extraordinary leaders do not accept “no” for an answer. Instead, they only hear “not yet” or “not this way.” Due to their clear vision, they learn from each mistake and obstacle instead of giving up or believing that someone else is in charge of their destiny. Like a seed, they persist until circumstances become favorable and then grow through the concrete.

Many times in life, and for no other reason, you will be successful because others will quit, you will not. The clarity of your vision alone will dictate your success. Extraordinary leaders don’t set goals. They set expectations.

To read more leadership blog articles by Kevin Snyder, click the titles below:

The Common Denominator of Success
How to Bounce Back from Failure
The Jim Carrey Graduation Speech
The Power of Perspective

 

Learn more about keynote speaker Dr. Kevin Snyder and his story: campuspeak.com/snyder

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Release Self-Neglect and Love Yourself in Action http://www.campuspeak.com/loveyourself/ Tue, 24 Jan 2017 20:38:18 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23497     When it comes to moving toward more fierce loving of your own body, speaker and founder of bodyheart, Amber Krzys is an expert. She recently sat down for a podcast with Sexyfit to talk about the importance of creating a positive body image that will help carry out more meaningful New Year’s resolutions. You can […]

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Amber Krzys

 

When it comes to moving toward more fierce loving of your own body, speaker and founder of bodyheart, Amber Krzys is an expert. She recently sat down for a podcast with Sexyfit to talk about the importance of creating a positive body image that will help carry out more meaningful New Year’s resolutions.

You can hear the podcast episode here.

Learn more about keynote speaker Amber Krzys and her story: campuspeak.com/krzys

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Showing Up With Purpose & Embracing Vulnerability in 2017 http://www.campuspeak.com/showingup/ Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:25:07 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23479     We have all been affected by trauma: violence, disease, injustice, poverty. I believe that these certain events in our lives (both in personal and societal spheres) resonate with us and inspire us to change the world for the better. Some of us just lack the courage and insight to step out into our […]

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Brittany Piper

We have all been affected by trauma: violence, disease, injustice, poverty. I believe that these certain events in our lives (both in personal and societal spheres) resonate with us and inspire us to change the world for the better. Some of us just lack the courage and insight to step out into our calling.

For myself, it was an unfortunate event of sexual violence that caused me to rethink how I wanted to live and participate in the world. It was this event that made me change my college major and career path so that I could pursue more meaningful work in the empowerment of women.

As some of us wade into 2017 with a deep sense of fear, anger and heartbreak, we must consider how to react to the circumstances which brought us here, especially when they seed in us a desire to implement positive change. My proposal: embrace your vulnerability on the path to discovering your own calling. Here are three steps to getting started:

1. Spend time alone

To pursue work that’s meaningful to you, you must truly know your own heart and identity. What do you stand for? What are you passionate about? For myself, spending six months travelling and working overseas allowed me to explore my passions and identity while stripped of societies definition of who I was. Back home, I was so consumed with what others were doing or what others thought that I lost touch with Me.

By literally unplugging from the world I was most comfortable in, I was able to spend time tending to the greening of my own identity. It was in this vulnerable state that I learned who Brittany was without a screen in her face, a phone in her hand or a person by her side. No one was there to tell me what to think or who to be. As I ventured inward, I noticed how quiet the world got and how loud and clear my voice became. I met Me for the first time. Now, I’m not suggesting you have to relocate to the other side of the globe as I did, I’m simply saying spend time with You more often. It could be getting outside, reading, writing or meditating. Seek space where you can really hear yourself.

2. Take Risks

To take risks is to trust in the unknowing. I believe that if we knew what was on the other side of each decision, we wouldn’t be taking a risk. For instance, it took me moving away from my loved ones and working three different jobs in three different countries to figure out where my passions truly lied. Only through this trial and error was I able to truly learn more about my calling to meaningful work. Yes, taking risks is scary and it leaves you incredibly vulnerable. However, I encourage you to embrace it. If you fail, just chalk it up to a shitty first (or even a second or third) draft. Taking risks allows you to discover the growth in your failures and ultimately your journey.

3. Stay Open

I urge you to keep your heart open to all experiences, all relationships, all different cultures and points of view. It’s true that to leave yourself constantly open and undefended to others also allows you to be vulnerable to hurt. In relation, the term vulnera comes from the Latin meaning “to wound.” But what if you experience the opposite? What if by leaving yourself open to all experiences and people, you are gifted with the ability to expand, change, and grow? Aim to step out of your comfort zone and place yourself in other’s shoes. You may just find that this world shares more commonalities than differences. Be willing to learn from everyone and everything.

I believe that now more than ever, as the next generation of leaders, millennials are striving and aspiring to do more than just live, but rather live and show up with purpose. As you continue to step into this new year and perhaps your new calling, seek to appreciate the vulnerability you feel. Life’s trials and struggles will always be unfolding, but always remember to pursue a meaningful and courageous response.

Learn more about our speaker, Brittany Piper and her story: campuspeak.com/speakers/brittany.

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Put On Your Oxygen Mask First: Prioritizing Self-Care http://www.campuspeak.com/selfcare/ Tue, 24 Jan 2017 17:14:15 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23473   It’s the beginning of 2017. Are you already feeling stressed out? After the holiday season, we tend to be that much harder on ourselves and the start of a new year can feel even more overwhelming. When the workload has got you down, one of the best things you can do is take preventative […]

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Lauren Cook

It’s the beginning of 2017. Are you already feeling stressed out? After the holiday season, we tend to be that much harder on ourselves and the start of a new year can feel even more overwhelming. When the workload has got you down, one of the best things you can do is take preventative steps to protect your wellbeing. We call this self-care. What is self-care? I like to envision it like this: have you noticed that when you’re preparing to takeoff in an airplane the flight attendant demonstrates how to use the oxygen mask? They always say to put your own oxygen mask on first before helping someone else. This is exactly how self-care works. We need to invest in our well-being before we can help others.

Lauren Cook

Self-care includes anything that you love to do. What makes you feel recharged, well-rested, and happy? I especially love how Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi conceptualizes self-care with the notion of “flow.” Flow is the optimal state when we are so in the moment that we lose track of time.[i] The activity is so emotionally stimulating and engaging that we don’t care what other priorities we have on our list. And if you’re not sure what you love to do or when you are in “flow?” Follow your natural curiosity and talent and see what you find. Be willing to experiment with your creativity and be open to new experiences.

What are some different things that you can do for self-care? I’m listing a plethora of options for you below.

Self-Care Set

Hold, walk, or play with your pet ~ Go for a bike ride ~ Sing in the car ~ Visit the water ~ Let go of something ~ Drink something warm ~ Be alone ~ Watch a funny video ~

Eat dessert ~ Travel to a new country ~ Unplug from your phone ~ Talk a walk ~

Plant something ~ Take a bath ~ Cook a delicious meal ~ Take a nap ~

Spend time with loved ones ~ Read a book ~ Lose track of time ~ Forgive yourself ~

Visit a Farmer’s Market ~ Learn something new ~ Try a new hobby ~ Create something ~

Watch a movie ~ Meet someone that inspires you ~ Organize your space ~

Watch a sunset ~ Give and get hugs ~ Write in a journal ~ Meet with a therapist ~

Wander around town ~ Meditate ~ Write a sincere note to someone ~ Get a massage ~

Call a friend ~ Speak kindly to others ~ Engage in small acts of kindness ~ Go for a hike ~

Sit outside ~ Light a candle ~ Take a yoga class ~ Dance ~ Drive somewhere unknown ~ Bake a treat you love ~ Visit a park ~ Paint a picture ~ Go for a run ~ Watch a show ~ Write a poem~ Buy some flowers ~ Practice gratitude ~ Watch the clouds ~ Stretch ~ Watch some Netflix ~ Sit in the sun ~ Wear an outfit that you feel great in ~

Cuddle up in a blanket ~ Decorate your space ~ Watch sports ~ Breathe fresh air ~ Pray ~ Chat with a friend ~ Drink plenty of water ~ Listen to a podcast ~ Do a crossword puzzle ~ Work on a puzzle ~ Play Sudoku ~ Spend time with kids ~ Volunteer ~ Go shopping ~

Plan a vacation ~ Go swimming ~ Play an instrument ~ Sleep in ~ Visit family ~

Celebrate important milestones ~ Laugh ~ Step away from work ~ Go to a comedy show ~ Use a coloring book ~ Knit ~ Visit an art museum ~ Go to a concert ~ Play on Pinterest ~ Sleep eight hours ~ Play video games ~ Plant a garden ~ Clean your space ~

Join an intramural team ~ Visit a spiritual place ~ Clean out your inbox ~ Get a haircut ~

Build something ~ Make your bed ~ Sit by a fireplace ~ Compliment someone ~

Give someone a gift ~ Do what you loved as a kid ~ Listen to the sounds of nature

 

Self-care is a commitment. It’s easy to say that you will start adding these different ideas to your routine but if you don’t create a plan, it won’t happen. You need to be proactive with your self-care and actually pencil it in your schedule, just as you would with class assignments and work deadlines. My recommendation is that you pick at least one self-care item per day each week. If you’re smart with your planning, you can incorporate multiple things that you love into one activity. Therefore, a self-care schedule for the week might look like this:

Monday: Take a yoga class. Drink plenty of water afterwards.

Tuesday: Watch a movie with friends after studying together. Eat some popcorn.

Wednesday: Listen to a Ted Talk while getting ready for the day. Cook dinner with a roommate.

Thursday: Go for a hike after class with a classmate.

Friday: Watch the football game. Go to the dance afterwards and see friends. Wear a favorite outfit that you feel confident in.

Saturday: Sleep in and have an amazing breakfast. Go window shopping or play video games for an hour after getting some work done.

Sunday: Play a board game with the family. Listen to your favorite playlist then read a new book.

Many people think self-care is simple and some even scoff at why we “waste time” talking about it. Well, if everyone were so great at it, then we wouldn’t need to take the time to talk about self-care. But clearly, people are not prioritizing their mental and physical health and they develop short and long-term problems as a result. In fact, those who are burdened by anxiety and stress have a decreased capacity to remember information in their long-term memory and thus have a harder time on their exams, even if they earned good grades during the year.[ii] If we’re not careful, negative experiences like these can build up and it can make it easier for depression to surface. We have to be intentional about our wellbeing. Tough circumstances are bound to be a part of our life so we have to come back with self-care that much harder. For every negative experience we have, we need to have at least three positive experiences to make up for it.[iii]

It’s clear that self-care is the secret for not only having wellbeing today but for years to come. It’s best to develop the habit of practicing self-care now rather than putting it off for later. But remember to give yourself grace as you learn the art of wellbeing. Many people engage in all or nothing thinking when it comes to daily self-care. They either work tirelessly and never give themselves a break or they veg out all day (or week) and are unable to accomplish anything. The trick is finding that sweet spot where you are still able to complete assignments and finish tasks while still having some fun. Some days it will be easier to find this sense of balance but when you do have an off balance day, remember that you can always have a fresh start tomorrow.

Once you start getting in the habit of self-care, you’ll see how much fun it is. You’ll quickly see the benefits and not only will you begin to feel happier, the people around you will feel more positive as well. Our emotions are contagious and that works in either direction. When you are stressed, you’re more likely to snap at others, complain, and just be generally unpleasant. This permeates to others and they either will start to avoid you or join in with the whining. But if you are feeling well-rested, you’re more likely to meet the day with optimism, kindness, and a can-do mentality. Others will gravitate towards your goodwill and they will feel better just by being around you. So here’s to a well-rested start to the year—this is your year to find your joy.

 

[i] Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: Harper Collins.

[ii] Hawn, G., & Holden, W. (2011). 10 Mindful Minutes: Giving Our Children–and Ourselves–the Social and Emotional Skills to Reduce Stress and Anxiety for Healthier, Happy Lives. Penguin.

[iii] Fredrickson, B. L., & Kurtz, L. E. (2011). Cultivating positive emotions to enhance human flourishing. Applied positive psychology: Improving everyday life, health, schools, work, and society, 35-47.

 

 

Learn more about keynote speaker, Lauren Cook and her story: campuspeak.com/cook

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The “secret sauce” of SNL’s success is dropping the drama http://www.campuspeak.com/dropthedrama/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 21:36:45 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23408   It is strange that a show like Saturday Night Live’s success comes from removing “drama,” but it’s true! To understand why, let’s first talk about belonging, psychological safety and authenticity. Belonging. My friends Gentry and Josh over at Dyad Strategies told me a lot about belonging that I already knew. Good research can uncover […]

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David Stollman

 

It is strange that a show like Saturday Night Live’s success comes from removing “drama,” but it’s true! To understand why, let’s first talk about belonging, psychological safety and authenticity.

Belonging. My friends Gentry and Josh over at Dyad Strategies told me a lot about belonging that I already knew. Good research can uncover ideas that make you say, “duh,” because common sense helps us come to some conclusions naturally. Sometimes, it makes so much sense, that on face value, it’s easy to accept. The feeling of belonging matters. In fact, a member’s depth of feeling that they belong to an organization will predict most aspects of their experience, like their level of commitment and identification with the organization. The more one feels they belong, the more one expects a correlation of those factors.

Why do people feel that they belong? And, what can your organization do to help deepen that feeling? One answer comes from the “secret sauce” of Saturday Night Live’s success –  psychological safety. Charles Duhigg (Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times) writes about the role psychological safety plays at SNL in Fast Company. Since 1975 when the show first aired, the one constant has always been Lorne Michaels, the show’s first and only executive producer. Michaels says the reason why Saturday Night Live has succeeded is because he believes in abiding by two rules: giving everyone a voice, and enforcing that people need to really listen to each other.

A positive communication culture is a key to psychological safety, and essential for organizations to truly be successful. Positive communication culture doesn’t just allow, but encourage us to bring our true selves out. A lot has been written about the power of authenticity, but without the necessary communication within a group that destroy the barriers, authenticity is difficult to achieve.

Think of those rare times in your life where everyone in a group was comfortable taking off the masks they hide behind daily. The Breakfast Club is a great example. It brought us back to high school and shoved those social constructs and divisive norms in our faces. The longer the group of high schoolers stay trapped in detention hall together, the more they begin to show more of their authentic selves. By removing the “masks,” it allowed them to have deeper connections amongst each other. It made us all look back with disgust at those unwritten rules that prevented the friendship between the jock and nerd just one day before. The success of the story was in the proximity of the fantasy that should be, to the reality of what is. Authentic relationships fall just out of our grasp and always desired.

There are ways to create these spaces within our sisterhoods and brotherhoods. It takes deliberate effort, training, and strong leadership, but the negative communication patterns and norms can be replaced. “Drama” between members blocks psychological safety, authenticity and prevents the feeling of belonging. The drama that swirls through our organizations can be fought and beaten back.

Here are a few of strategies that I teach in my Drop the Drama program on critical communication skills for organizations and their members:

Personal Strategies

  • Don’t talk about them unless you’ve talked to them
  • Don’t listen to someone talk about someone unless they’ve talked to them
  • Be a great listener – help members feel safe to “take off their masks” with you

Organizational Strategies

  • Measurable membership standards clearly communicated regularly
  • Trained mediators that do not hold another chapter office
  • Regular skills training in confrontation and communication

We’ve all experienced a place where we can truly be ourselves, and when we explain it to others it just doesn’t translate. We tell that story, but the feeling can’t be shared through our words. I hate the saying that printed on many t-shirts: From the outside, you can’t understand and from the inside, you can’t explain. But, should that be how we feel with our sisters and brothers? Don’t settle for less. Fix it! Drop the Drama!!

Learn more about keynote speaker David Stollman and his newest keynote Drop the Drama: campuspeak.com/stollman.

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Tom Healy releases his new book, Limitless Leadership. http://www.campuspeak.com/healybook/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 19:28:04 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23392   Speaker Tom Healy is passionate about helping students reach their extraordinary leadership potential. For the past seven years, Tom has used his straightforward style to empower students by challenging them, making them laugh and most importantly, helping them thrive as a leader in everything they do! Tom recently released his new book, Limitless Leadership: […]

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Tom Healy

Speaker Tom Healy is passionate about helping students reach their extraordinary leadership potential. For the past seven years, Tom has used his straightforward style to empower students by challenging them, making them laugh and most importantly, helping them thrive as a leader in everything they do!

Tom recently released his new book, Limitless Leadership: Find Your Drive to Thrive. Through his personal experiences, extensive research and working directly with thousands of student leaders across the country, Tom has developed a specific system for student leaders to thrive. Here are the key actions Tom walks the reader through:

  • Be the hardest worker in the room. Outwork everyone around you, and help others understand the value of hard work.
  • Have a laser-focused vision. Know what you want for your future. Work with others to develop strong visions for organizations you are involved with.
  • Surround yourself with good people. Build and army of good people to make you a better leader, and constantly work to connect good people and organizations with each other.
  • Be authentic 24/7. Be your authentic self, and encourage others to be comfortable in doing the same.
  • Be a problem solver. Create solutions for the problems around you, and make sure organizations you are involved with have the same attitude.
  • Always persevere. Fight through whatever life throws your way, and help those around you fight through adversity as well.

You can find more information about Tom’s book, audiobook and Kindle e-book by visiting here.

Learn more about leadership speaker Tom Healy and his story: campuspeak.com/healy.

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2017: Your Year of Practicing Badassery http://www.campuspeak.com/badassery/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:38:11 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23378     Every year in January we are bombarded with the #NewYearNewYou, that consists of promises to lose some pounds by giving up all of our favorite foods and doing some kind of fitness challenge, only to quit it all in a matter of weeks. Well, this year I am challenging you to something greater, […]

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Jennifer Cassetta

 

Every year in January we are bombarded with the #NewYearNewYou, that consists of promises to lose some pounds by giving up all of our favorite foods and doing some kind of fitness challenge, only to quit it all in a matter of weeks. Well, this year I am challenging you to something greater, something deeper. I am challenging you to have your most badass year to date.

The Urban Dictionary defines badassery as “engaging in seemingly impossible activities and achieving success in a manner that renders all onlookers completely awestruck.”

In 2004, after four years of blood, sweat and tears at a martial arts school in New York City, I finally tested for my black belt in Hapkido. We were instructed that the test would start at 4 am and that we needed to be prepared to train for several hours. That’s it. The rest would be a surprise. So, I and the others I trained with, prepped ourselves as best we could and practiced our forms, trained our techniques, adjusted our sleep schedules and our diets to get ready for the big test.

The night before the test, knowing that I had to be up early, I barely slept. But, I got myself there and after eight long hours of physically grueling work, we finished! I can’t tell you exactly what we did in the test because, a) it’s just a big blur and b) it’s like the first rule of Fight Club. You don’t talk about Fight Club. We all passed the test and received our first black belt. After the test, friends (non-martial artists) would ask me things like, why is the test so long? Or, why can’t you drink any water during testing? Or, why does it have to start at 4 am?

What I realized is that our martial arts master intentionally designed the black belt test to challenge us mentally, even more so than physically. Becoming a black belt wasn’t just about memorizing forms and techniques; it was about challenging your mental beliefs and your self-imposed limits.

Whether we are aware of them or not, we all have these self-imposed limits. Maybe something like, “That’s just the way I am.” Or, “I’ll never be like…” Many times we develop limitations because of our past or what others tell us about ourselves. Regardless, let 2017 be the year to let them go. Take away the limitations and choose areas in your life that you will achieve true badassery in. Render onlookers awestruck. It is the year to step out of your comfort and into your greatness. It’s time to be a badass.

Instead of thinking that we have to accomplish some large feat in order to achieve badassery, I’d like to propose the act of practicing badassery. It’s setting the alarm at an ungodly hour to train, it’s studying long hours for a test, it’s sending out resumes for jobs out of your league and it’s standing up for others when they can’t stand up for themselves. I’m sure there are so many areas in your life where you can practice badassery this coming year and beyond. Let it show when you walk, talk and think.

Walk like a badass.
Body language is a skill that most of us take for granted. A large part of our communication actually comes from non-verbal cues that we give off with our posture, eye contact, and movement. Even on days when you’re not feeling so hot, you can change your thoughts and other’s perceptions of you by practicing badass body language. Shoulders back, head up, eye contact and walking with awareness and purpose shows onlookers that you are on a mission and have no time for nonsense. Eyes and thumbs on your phone, headphones on and stumbling show vulnerability and disengagement with the outside world.

Talk like a badass.
Your tone is as important as language. Use your tone deliberately when you want to powerfully communicate a message. Lower your tone at the end of a sentence to let people know you are complete in your thought. Choose words mindfully when speaking to yourself or others. Ask yourself if your message is spreading positive or negative ideas or vibes to yourself and those around you. Try not to add more negativity as there is enough out there already.

Think like a badass.
Being a badass starts in the mind. A true badass doesn’t let life just happen to them. They take responsibility for as much of their life as possible (and badasses accept when life throws a few curveballs every so often), which includes their health, safety, career, and relationships. A small daily practice is to replace negative self-defeating thoughts with an empowering mantra. A mantra is a word or sentence that create to counteract negative thoughts. You can even use: I am a badass!

Practice random acts of kindness.
Focusing on improving ourselves is great. but, giving love, attention, and your skills to others is honorable and true badassery. Random acts of kindness are so rewarding because the recipient isn’t expecting it. It can be as easy as giving a compliment to buying a cup of coffee for a stranger. The act can be small, but the impact can be enormous.

So tell me, how will you practice badassery this year?

Learn more about badass keynote speaker Jennifer Cassetta’s new keynote, The Principles of Badassery and her story at campuspeak.com/cassetta

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Interview: Be bold, stay humble – how cancer helped two people find their life’s work http://www.campuspeak.com/cancerprevention/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 14:54:27 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23341 According to the National Cancer Institute, there were approximately 1,685,210 new cases of cancer in the United States in 2016. In 2014, 15,780 children, ages 0-19 years of age were diagnosed with this common disease. Sadly, it is estimated that 39.6% of the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives […]

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According to the National Cancer Institute, there were approximately 1,685,210 new cases of cancer in the United States in 2016. In 2014, 15,780 children, ages 0-19 years of age were diagnosed with this common disease. Sadly, it is estimated that 39.6% of the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives (National Cancer Institute, March 14, 2016). Every year, the month of February is recognized as National Cancer Prevention Month. Cancer has affected many lives: those who are battling the disease, those who are survivors and those who are supporting them.

We interviewed two of our keynote speakers who have had their own unique experiences with cancer and how it has changed their lives. Jess Ekstrom, founder of Headbands of Hope and Ethan Zohn, winner of the television show, Survivor who, at a high point in his life and career, has hurled into a moment where he had to fight to survive again – this time, for his life.

 

Jess Ekstrom

 

CS: Tell us more about your company, Headbands of Hope.

Jess: Headbands of Hope restores confidence and self-expression in children undergoing cancer treatment through a simple accessory. For every headband sold, one is given to a child with cancer.

CS: What made you decide to start a company that revolves around children battling cancer?

Jess: During the summer of 2011 when I was in college, I interned at a wish-granting organization for kids with life-threatening illnesses. I saw so many girls migrating towards headbands instead of wigs after hair-loss. Headbands gave them the opportunity to regain their feminine identity without hiding what they’re going through with a wig. I started searching for an organization that provided headbands to girls undergoing chemotherapy, but couldn’t find any. So, I founded HeadbandsOfHope.com in April 2012 during my junior year of college. For every headband sold, one is given to a child with cancer. Today, we have donated over 100,000 headbands to every children’s hospital in the United States and in five countries!

CS: What’s one of the best memories you have since you founded Headbands of Hope?

Jess: Every time I walk into a hospital room, my whole life shifts around and nothing else matters except for that moment. One time, I gave a girl a headband and she said she wanted to give me a headband too, but asked if it was okay that my headband was on a piece of paper. On another hospital visit, I met a 15-year-old girl and spent the day with her. Her mom called me a week later saying that she had passed away. Her mom said she was calling me because she wanted headbands for all the women to wear to her funeral the next day because she loved her headband so much during her last week of life. It’s moments like these that define why I do what I do. If I can make a girl feel normal and comfortable in her own skin with just a headband, then I’m going to do everything I can to make sure I give a headband to every girl battling cancer.

CS: What are your goals for your company in 2017?

Jess: We’ve developed a new donation program where the kids can actually create their own headbands in the hospitals. It combines our mission of giving headbands with much-needed art therapy. We provide the supplies; they create flower crowns! Our goal this year is to really expand that and give patients the opportunity to create something beautiful to wear for themselves or gift to someone else.

CS: How does your work and experiences with Headbands of Hope transfer to your work as a keynote speaker on college campuses? What is the biggest takeaway for the students you speak to?

Jess: I started my company in college, and I’m so glad I did. There were so many resources there to help me and I learned so much at such a young age. I hope that my story about how I started can inspire students to not wait for the “perfect time” to take action. The perfect time is the moment you’re inspired. The biggest takeaway is always taking responsibility for the world’s problems. If we don’t believe we can solve them, nothing will ever get done.

CS: If a student was interested in becoming an entrepreneur, but wasn’t sure where to begin, what would your advice be?

Jess: In the book, Start With Why, by Simon Sinek, he defines the difference between success and achievement. Achievement comes when you attain WHAT you want. Success comes when you’re in clear pursuit of WHY you want it. It helped me realize that we need to stop seeing tangible achievement as our final destination. We can attain a new car and expensive vacations, but we can only feel success deep in our hearts, where it’s difficult to put those feelings into words. The moment I open the door to a girl’s hospital room with a basket of headbands and see her smile, that’s when I feel my success. There’s no other way to explain it. There’s no numerical number I hit or competitor I beat. It’s just that feeling that I get where I know that all my hard work is making an impact and changing a life. When you have a clear vision of your “why,” work doesn’t have to feel like work. My biggest piece of advice to other entrepreneurs is to not just find your why, but also keep it in clear sight. Put it in a frame, wear it on a bracelet, post it on your fridge. When things get hard, your why can get blurry. Always keep it in clear focus to help you through it.

Learn more about Jess

Ethan Zohn

CS: As a cancer survivor, would you share how and when you first learned of your diagnosis? Were there any signs or symptoms?

Ethan: I was an ex-pro soccer player and Survivor winner, training for the NYC Marathon. I was happy, healthy and on top of the world. I had some really itchy skin, night sweats, and weight loss. I tried every pill, cream, potion, and lotion out there. It wasn’t until about four months later that they found a mass in my chest and swollen lymph node under my collarbone. I was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer called CD20+ Hodgkin’s Lymphoma… trust me, I had never heard of it either.

CS: What would be your advice to others who might be battling cancer or have loved ones who are?

Ethan: Stay positive. Watch the movie, Gladiator. Keep your sense of humor. Surround yourself with family, friends, and positive people. You are not alone in this process and it’s going to be okay. Modern medicine is amazing and you have to have faith that the work these doctors do every day will save your life like it did mine and millions of others just like us. Also, take control back over the small things that you can control. You may have cancer, but you still have choices. And making the right choices can impact how well you respond to treatments and your overall prognosis. It’s easy to be blinded by the enormity of a diagnosis. But don’t forget to celebrate the small victories along the way and embrace the good days! In supporting a fighter, be truthful with them about your feelings and thoughts – love, happiness, sadness, questions, perceptions. Often the thoughts and feelings of a supporter are similar to that of the fighter. As a supporter, listen. Listening well is not easy, especially when the one you’re listening to is sick. Try not to let your personal fears for the fight confuse what the fighter is telling or asking you. Cancer tends to strip life down to its core elements. Fighters often gain a laser focus on what matters to them and will begin to seek a way in which to enhance what they identified as important. Fighters often struggle to find words or communicate these newly found values. A caregiver who listens and helps the fighter find ways to deepen their experience with these new values is giving one of the most powerful gifts possible: enrichment!

CS: What is the biggest lesson you learned from your experience?

Ethan: I’ve learned that nothing is more empowering than the truth. Nothing creates comfort and confidence more than knowing one isn’t alone in facing a life challenge. Be transparent with the ones you love and they will respond by taking into consideration your thoughts and feelings as you go through treatment and into survivorship.

CS: Tell me about your organization, Grassroot Soccer.

Ethan: Before Survivor and cancer, I lived and played pro-soccer in Zimbabwe. While I was there, I witnessed first-hand what was happening with HIV/AIDS and how this one disease was destroying the community I was now a part of. I saw my friends and teammates get sick and suffer. Fast forward a few years to Survivor and winning the grand prize of one million dollars. I invested that money into something much bigger than myself – I cofounded Grassroot Soccer. Grassroot Soccer is an adolescent health organization that leverages the power of soccer to educate, inspire, and mobilize youth in developing countries to overcome their greatest health challenges, live healthier, more productive lives, and be agents of change in their communities. We are currently in 50 countries and have graduated over 1.8 million children.

CS: What are the goals for Grassroot Soccer in 2017?

Ethan: Adolescents are being left behind in the fight against disease and other critical health challenges. There is a tremendous opportunity to improve the world’s health by promoting healthy practices during adolescence and taking steps to better protect young people from health risks. Our biggest goal for the future is to raise awareness for Grassroot Soccer here in the U.S. and work hard to inspire college students to use their powerful voices to create change locally and globally. We want to create the next generation of “game changers.”

CS: How has your work and experience transferred to your work as a keynote speaker on college campuses? What is the biggest takeaway for the students you speak to?

Ethan: That with all of our differences – man or woman, tall or short, fraternity or sorority, Division I or Division III – we all have one thing in common, we are all survivors on this earth for just a short time. But it’s not about HOW or WHEN you leave this world, it’s WHAT YOU DO to make the most of each day and of each crisis while we are here. Values and skills I learned in college are the same ones I used to win Survivor, survive cancer and build a business that is able to save lives and leave a legacy on this planet.

CS: If a student was interested in becoming an entrepreneur, but wasn’t sure where to begin, what would your advice be?

Ethan: Think about what makes your heart break and use your skill set to go out there and do something about it. Try to use a “bold, but humble” approach to entrepreneurship. Be bold enough to try new things and take chances, but be humble enough to know that you may need to ask for help and advice along the way. The bottom line is this – if you want to know the definition of fulfillment, I say follow your heart. Fight for a cause and see newly found hope in a person’s eyes because of something you were able to do for them.

Learn more about Ethan

Interested in bringing Jess or Ethan to campus? Email us at info@campuspeak.com or give us a call at (844) 745-8570.

Sources:
“Cancer Statistics.” https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/statistics. National Cancer Institute, 14 March 2016. Web. 10 January 2017.

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How law imitates life (from Life as a Courtroom) http://www.campuspeak.com/law/ Mon, 09 Jan 2017 21:18:56 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23334     As I have discovered, practicing law can be an all-encompassing profession. The law literally affects everything around us. It naturally follows, then, that I often use the law to make larger points about life. With the foregoing in mind, here are a few ways that the law imitates life. Passion Makes for a […]

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Joseph Richardson

 

As I have discovered, practicing law can be an all-encompassing profession. The law literally affects everything around us. It naturally follows, then, that I often use the law to make larger points about life. With the foregoing in mind, here are a few ways that the law imitates life.

Passion Makes for a Better Result
Passion is defined as “a strong liking or devotion to an activity, cause, or concept.” Individuals find their true power when they find their passion. In the best of circumstances, your power, driven by your passion, and guided by strong principles, will take you to the “promised land” of purpose.

At a young age, I learned that I had a passion for communicating. A family member told me very early on that I had the “gift of gab.” I turned that gift into being a published poet by high school, and a stand-up comedian in college. Because of a love for politics and legal issues, I decided early on that I wanted to be a lawyer, which combines two of my favorite things: law and communication. I have found my professional, passionate “sweet spot” in communicating, explaining, and even arguing the law within a court, and behind lecterns at colleges and law schools. Closing an argument in front of a jury with everything on the line is truly my “happy place.” And as a bonus, that passion has intensified as I discovered how to use the law to drastically improve a client’s situation, and thereby their very life.

At some point, we should all be able to answer the question, “Why am I here?” Said another way, what is my purpose? It is incredibly important that each of us find something that we are passionate about. Admittedly, some of us discover our purpose and passion more quickly than others. Once we understand our “why” and we discover our passion, we have to put in the work to learn what we can so that we can be everything we are to become a part of the thing we are passionate about. While passion can often get a project, goal, or dream started, it is dedication, commitment, and sheer will get us to the finish line. My most satisfying cases are ones where the purpose is clear. It fuels my passion for the law, and makes it much easier to get up in the morning., put in long hours, and even deal with related frustrations. Find your passion and you will manifest great power.

Hearsay is Not Dependable
In the legal world, hearsay is defined as “an out of court statement offered for its truth.” In other words, the person saying the hearsay statement in court does so because they (or their lawyer) want you to believe the statement is true. While at trial, as a general statement, I cannot have a witness testify as to what someone else said out of court. Even documents, because of written words on them, are inadmissible hearsay. The reason the hearsay rule exists is because hearsay testimony can be untrustworthy. No one in the courtroom was there when the person makes the statement, the disposition or context can be totally lost, and the person that supposedly spoke cannot be cross-examined right then! Therefore, without an exception to the hearsay rule which makes the statement more trustworthy even if stated out of court, the court will not consider that statement.

Sometimes in life, we are inclined to react, often negatively, because of what we are told that someone else said, often about us. Most of us hear about something second or third hand, leading to our offense, anger, or some other big misunderstanding that changes out plans, or our relationships. All the while, getting the information directly, or from the “horse’s mouth,” so to speak, would have led to a different impression and therefore conclusion.

Technology (i.e. social media) is an unwitting accomplice to the hearsay problem. They allow us to hid behind emojis, to say important things without looking someone in the eye, and often have us weighing in on matters involving others that do not really concern us. Even texting is dangerous because the context of the statement and the disposition of the speaker are not apparent from the text alone. Also, people are more likely to say things that are not themselves when they can hide behind their phone or device while they say it.

We should never make a major decision about someone or something based on hearsay. Just like lawyers see it as an “out of court” statement, we should see hearsay as “out of bounds” in our campus and community lives. In leadership, have conversations with your team or colleagues directly if you perceive, or have heard there is a problem. We cheat ourselves when we do not exercise our “communication muscle” and have direct and frank conversations about situations in life, leadership or relationships. All communication about important issues should be in person whenever possible.

Admissible Evidence Tells Your Story
At a recent trial of mine, we had about 1000 documents that were each a piece of evidence. Not even half of those documents were actually admitted into evidence. The judge ruled on what was admissible after a great deal of fighting between the attorneys. Both sides wanted to keep bad evidence out and get good evidence in. We always emphasize as lawyers that the existence of evidence is one thing, but the admissibility of evidence is another, more crucial matter. And, importantly, it is the admissible evidence (i.e. what gets in) that the trier of fact (jury) will consider when making a decision.

All of us, whether students, or other campus stakeholders, or community members, should understand that we develop: “admissible evidence” as we live our lives. Our activities and choices give clear “admissible evidence” of our priorities, our integrity, and our character. So, when you are seeking to be a leader for a campus organization, what “admissible evidence” will your peers use to make the call? In the best of worlds, your activity to that point should make it easier, and not harder, for your peers to see you as a leader. Down the road, when you’re applying for a great job 10 or 20 years after you graduate, and a fellow alum is on the hiring committee, or knows someone on the hiring committee, what will be the “admissible evidence” from your life that they could use? It may be how hard you studied (or did not study) for a test. It may be how often you were late to class. It may be problems with self-control, or maybe even alcohol and drug use. How much would you change about your conduct now if you really understood it could help make or break a big opportunity years or decades from now?

Now, from a legal standpoint, some things are not supposed to be considered by employers making a hiring decision (that’s an article, or a book, in and of itself). However, people most often make decisions based on information that they know. A resume is pieces of information, as is a reference, or a good word put in by a friend. When it comes to a job or other opportunity, never think that your reputation is inadmissible evidence. In fact, it’s some of the best admissible evidence there is. And, to be sure, your reputation is something that does not expire. Admittedly, this could be unfair, because most people change and mature over time. But, welcome to real life!

If you make a strong impression, good or bad, that impression is not likely to be lost on those you “impressed.” People are more likely to trust, here or otherwise work with you because of what you’ve done, and because what they’ve heard, not despite those things. So if you want life’s “admissible evidence” to tell the best story about you it can, what’s the best way forward? First, be as earnest and positive as you can, taking responsibility for your outcomes and admitting fault when necessary. Second, get a family member or friend that you trust, and ask them how you’re doing on your “life interview.” Find out the difference between the evidence that people know about you and the evidence that you want them to know about you. Then, make it your business to work to close the gap. That way, you ensure that people in your environment have the best, and the truest “admissible evidence” about you. By helping to shape your opportunities going forward, your “admissible evidence” will be a gift that keeps on giving. So, treat every moment of every day in your campus and community life like you are on the interview for a lifetime… because you are.

Learn more about keynote speaker Joseph Richardson and his keynotes: campuspeak.com/richardson

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Farewell, President Obama. Hello, President Trump? Hmm… Are we still having Black History Month? http://www.campuspeak.com/bhm/ Mon, 09 Jan 2017 16:51:32 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=23291 The 2016 Presidential Election will go down in history as one of the most divisive elections of all time. No matter who won the election, a major portion of the United States population was not going to be happy with the outcome. Like him or not, Donald Trump is the new President of the United […]

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David Otunga
The 2016 Presidential Election will go down in history as one of the most divisive elections of all time. No matter who won the election, a major portion of the United States population was not going to be happy with the outcome. Like him or not, Donald Trump is the new President of the United States of America. Now, where do we go from here? What does this mean for our country? What does this mean for immigrants and children of immigrants? There’s a multitude of questions and uncertainty that is worrying students, faculty, and the general public. This is addressed in my newest keynote, where I will help assuage concern and redirect focus on unity and encouraging our youth to work together to repair this fractured country.

A major bone of contention throughout the Presidential Election was the controversial Black Lives Matter movement. The Black Lives Matter movement started off in a positive manner, aimed at reducing the epidemic of homicidal police violence against African-American men. As the movement grew, it became perverted by extremists and now has come to stand for something it is not. This is another important part of my keynote. I will discuss the origins of the Black Lives Matter movement, what it was intended to be and what it was not intended to be and what it has become. The keynote will help the audience understand both sides and how to work together to achieve the desired result.

The future of the country has many LGBTQ+ individuals nervous about their rights and the country regressing in their acceptance. History repeats itself, in different forms. In the 1960s, interracial marriage was heavily opposed in the United States and today same-sex marriages face the same opposition. My parents are an interracial couple that married in 1966, during the height of the interracial marriage opposition. I openly discuss the difficulty my parents went through to be together, considering my mother is the granddaughter of a Ku Klux Klan leader from Ohio and my father was an immigrant from Nairobi, Kenya in East Africa. The principles used to gain acceptance of interracial marriage are very similar to those being used now to help LGBTQ+ people gain acceptance and marriage equality.

Whether intentional or unintentional, there is undoubtedly an underlying tone of racial and ethnic discrimination that is being perpetuated. Being a biracial man, I have encountered racial discrimination my whole life; from subtle discrimination to bold and overt discrimination. I have been discriminated from both sides: Caucasian-Americans, as well as African-Americans. I have even been discriminated against for having an athletic physique.

Discrimination comes in all forms and many people don’t intend to discriminate but do so subconsciously. In my keynote, I foster an environment for people of all races to feel comfortable in discussing difficult issues and teaching effective and appropriate methods for use in the classroom and on campus.

The very fact that I am the product of a Ku Klux Klansmen’s granddaughter and an African immigrant, who went on to become a Harvard Law School graduate, attorney, professional wrestler, actor and television personality shows the power of change from one generation to the next. I am currently raising my young son, and imparting on him the importance of acceptance, inclusion, and equality among all people of all backgrounds. I am very optimistic about the future of our country because I have faith in our generation and especially in the generations to follow.

David Otunga’s keynote is the perfect addition to your Black History Month event, to start an open dialogue about the Black Lives Matter movement or another diversity-focused programming. Learn more about speaker David Otunga’s keynote by visiting his speaker page: campuspeak.com/otunga.

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Top 5 reasons you should attend College Speakers Academy 2017 http://www.campuspeak.com/csa2017/ http://www.campuspeak.com/csa2017/#respond Wed, 21 Dec 2016 11:11:26 +0000 http://www.campuspeak.com/?p=19025           College Speakers Academy (CSA) will be in San Juan, Puerto Rico for 2017. Participating in this two-day seminar is an awesome way for new and seasoned speakers alike to learn the ins and outs of building a successful career speaking to college students. If you’re on the fence about attending, […]

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CSA 2017

 

 

 

 

 

College Speakers Academy (CSA) will be in San Juan, Puerto Rico for 2017. Participating in this two-day seminar is an awesome way for new and seasoned speakers alike to learn the ins and outs of building a successful career speaking to college students. If you’re on the fence about attending, consider our Top Five Reasons you should attend CSA 2017:

1. Learn from the experts. It is a rare opportunity to be able to learn from speakers and professionals who devote their professional careers specifically toward college speaking. During CSA, you’ll have full access to CAMPUSPEAK’s experienced faculty and interaction with some of our most experienced keynote speakers. Who better to learn from than the experts themselves?

2. Answer your burning questions. The Higher Education community can be incredibly difficult to break into. So many speakers who want to grow their business in this special market get hung up when trying to learn the language, culture, and trends of the industry. We take the time to address overarching information that everyone needs to hear. With CSA’s intimate setting, all attendees have the opportunity to ask specific questions that relate to their topic of interest.

3. Deepen your understanding. With so many choices for college speakers, it is important to deepen your understanding of who exactly you’re trying to reach and what about yourself sets you apart from the competition. We can help you determine which special niche areas might be the best fit for your area of expertise, and will share ideas for your continued professional development as a speaker.

4. Think differently about marketing. When people think about marketing, they may only consider sending emails to campus administrators and developing a social media presence. However, truly successful speakers know that marketing is much more than a fancy email or catchy Twitter hashtag. At CSA, we will discuss how a three-pronged approach to marketing (digital, print, and human networking), helps speakers in the Higher Education market find more success in their outreach efforts.

5. Develop an action plan. After years of providing this program for speakers who want an extra advantage when building their presence in Higher Education, we’ve developed an action plan that allows you to get started after CSA ends. This document is your blueprint for success and can guide even the most seasoned speaker in creating a business that allows more campus visits and more student impact.

Interested in attending College Speakers Academy 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico June 26th-27th? Learn more and register today at campuspeak.com/academy. As a special incentive for checking out our top five reasons to attend, use promo code: TOPFIVE to receive $50 off your registration rate! Early registration ends March 31st.

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